New Global Cathodic Protection & Corrosion Costs Study Announced By Corrosion Society

NACE International has begun an expansive global study that will examine the cathodic protection and corrosion costs across a variety of industries. The effort will provide research on controlling corrosion-related costs, which will help improve corrosion and cathodic protection strategies. 

NACE International, an international corrosion and corrosion engineering society based in Houston, Texas, has announced the launch of a two-year global cathodic protection and corrosion costs study that will examine the financial and societal effects of corrosion on a variety of industries and provide data about methods for controlling costs related to corrosion.

Industries covered by the corrosion costs study include manufacturing, infrastructure, transportation, utilities and government. The study will integrate research from partners in international and regional industry and academia and will be managed by Elaine Bowman, a longtime corrosion industry advocate and former president of NACE International.

“Corrosion is an inevitable, but controllable process which can result in destructive, even catastrophic incidents when not properly prevented and managed,” Bowman said in a press release. “Costs associated with corrosion control include direct expenses like repair and replacement of assets. But there are additional indirect costs like production lost due to closure for repairs or the environmental and physical impact of corrosion-related failures.”

The cathodic protection and corrosion costs study will help asset owners identity ways to save up to 30 percent on costs related to controlling corrosion, Bowman said.

“The NACE corrosion costs study will likely provide invaluable data for us and our customers going forward,” said Ted Huck, who works as the practice lead for plants and facilities with MATCOR, a cathodic protection company that specializes in providing customized corrosion engineering and cathodic protection systems.

“Essential information and comprehensive scientific modeling about corrosion will only improve our understanding of the impact of corrosion on the oil and gas and other industries we serve,” Huck said. “And that means even better corrosion and cathodic protection strategies and tactics for our customers.”

An earlier corrosion costs study in 2001 estimated that the annual direct costs of corrosion in the U.S. was $276 billion. The study, funded by the U.S. Congress with Federal Highway Administration oversight and NACE International support, resulted in the development of a Corrosion Policy and Oversight (CPO) office within the Department of Defense.

“Quantifying the costs of corrosion is an important effort in educating asset owners to the value of investing in asset life extension technologies such as cathodic protection to provide the lowest total cost of ownership,” said Huck. “Corrosion is a hidden, and often avoidable, cost to asset owners and something that can be mitigated with the appropriate use of current, available technologies.”

The CPO demonstrated a return as high as 40-to-1 on investments for corrosion control programs implemented by the Department of Defense. The 2001 study also resulted in congressional support for the world’s first undergraduate degree in corrosion engineering.

Further Reading

NACE International Commences Global Study on Corrosion Costs and Preventative Strategies,” Press Release, Nov. 14, 2013.

Houston Researcher Begins Phase 2 of Corrosion and Cathodic Protection Scale Study

Brine Chemistry Solutions is beginning phase two of a project researching corrosion and scale prediction. The corrosion and cathodic protection study will examine prevention in extreme pressure and temperature environments that could make drilling operations in the Gulf of Mexico safer and more productive.

Brine Chemistry Solutions, a Houston-based researcher of water chemistry issues in the energy industry, announced it has begun phase two of a research project that will evaluate corrosion and scale prediction and prevention at extreme pressure and temperature (xHP/HT).

Phase one of the research involved conducting experiments with instrumentation capable of studying corrosion and scale formation at up to 24,000 psi and 250°C (482°F). Phase one produced methodology and data that will be used in phase two to further develop the company’s models.

Phase two will include additional xHP/HT testing of corrosion and scale in additional alloy types and complex brine systems and will screen multiple inhibitors for thermal stability and effectiveness.

Brine Chemistry Solutions will use an autoclave reactor, proprietary flow-through apparatus, and vertical scanning interferometry to focus on kinetics and behavior at xHP/HT while simultaneously studying the thermal stability of inhibitors.

Modeling during phase two will also focus on solvent behavior in electrolytes that have specified chemical properties and will expand to include the quantification of kinetic factors during water-ion and ion-ion interactions. Modeling will incorporate the equation of state based on statistical associating fluids theory.

 “The corrosion and scale research being performed by Brine Chemistry Solutions is good for the Gulf of Mexico,” said Glenn Shreffler, executive vice president, engineering at MATCOR, a  cathodic protection company that specializes in providing customized corrosion engineering and cathodic protection systems to oil and gas and other industries.

“There are a literally hundreds of oil and gas production wells in the gulf but there’s not a lot of data about corrosion and scale in deepwater, extreme pressure and temperature environments,” Shreffler said. “That means this research has the potential to provide a great deal of information, including  predictive models, that will help us help our customers enhance production and improve safety and reliability.”

The corrosion and scale research is part of a larger, $4.5 million project that was awarded to Brine Chemistry Solutions by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America.

SOURCE: http://www.offshore-mag.com/articles/2013/11/brine-chemistry-solutions-launches-phase-ii-of-research-for-rpsea-project.html

Enbridge Energy applies to build pipeline from North Dakota

Enbridge Energy has applied to build the largest oil pipeline yet from western North Dakota’s booming oil patch and will soon begin courting oil producers to reserve space, a key step in a $2.6 billion project that would move millions of gallons of oil to Minnesota and Superior, Wis.

Enbridge Energy, based in Calgary, Alberta, is proposing the 612-mile Sandpiper pipeline to carry 225,000 barrels of oil each day to a hub in northern Minnesota and 375,000 barrels to one in northwestern Wisconsin. If approved by regulators, it would be the largest pipeline moving oil out of North Dakota, the nation’s second-leading producer of oil behind Texas.

North Dakota has more than doubled its oil production in the past two years, closing in on a million barrels of oil a day. But because of the lack of pipeline capacity in the state, about 60% of the state’s daily oil production is being shipped by rail. A barrel is equivalent to 42 gallons.

Enbridge Energy comments that the project is “needed and in the public interest.”

Oil shipped to Superior would be shipped through Wisconsin on a network of pipelines already in place. Enbridge Energy has proposed an expansion that would not add pipe in the state, but would expand pump stations to allow more oil to flow through the Wisconsin pipelines.

The pipeline is the biggest project yet to come before North Dakota regulators to move oil from the rich Bakken and Three Forks formations in the western part of the state, said Brian Kalk, who heads the North Dakota Public Service Commission. The three-member commission oversees a slew of public interests, from pipelines to grain elevators, though much of its recent work has involved the oil and natural gas industry.

A spokesperson for Enbridge Energy said the new pipeline would provide “a timely, cost effective and long-term transportation solution, thereby serving the public’s interest in improved access to an abundant, secure, and reliable crude oil supply to satisfy consumers’ demand for refined products.”

Kalk said the commission is reviewing the application and that at least three public hearings will be held in communities along the pipeline’s proposed route in North Dakota.

If it is approved, the two-phase expansion project for Wisconsin entails construction or upgrades at 13 Wisconsin pumping stations, along with three in Illinois, that would permit the pipeline from Superior to Illinois to triple its capacity to 1.2 million barrels a day from 400,000 barrels a day.

Enbridge Energy operates about 50,000 miles of pipelines in North America, and several hundred miles of pipelines in North Dakota, including one that runs between Minot, N.D., and Clearbrook, Minn. The line, built in 1962, has the capacity to ship 210,000 barrels of North Dakota crude daily, or about 8.8 million gallons.

SOURCE: http://www.jsonline.com/business/canadian-firm-applies-to-build-pipeline-from-north-dakota-to-superior-b99135995z1-230738391.html