Category Archives: Anodes

MATCOR’s Durammo™ Deep Anode System Provides Enhanced Performance

As we reach the home stretch of 2013, well drilling continues to advance at a strong pace, thanks to improvements of drilling technology. Advanced horizontal and directional drilling has opened a range of possibilities for energy companies and local economies. Along with the improved drilling technology, MATCOR has helped advanced the cathodic protection technology for wells.

Properly configured deep well anode systems are an integral portion of reliable cathodic protection wells. For deep well anode systems, which output less than approximately 75 amps, MATCOR has designed the Durammo™ continuous mixed metal oxide (MMO) wire anode systems to provide second-to-none value for those in need of high-quality cathodic protection systems.

Essentially, there are two basic types of anode configurations:

Discreet Anodes
Here, several individual anodes are placed a minimum of ten feet apart throughout the system in order to avoid mutual anode interface effects. In this configuration, it is not abnormal to have 10 or 15 discreet anodes throughout the system (old technology).

Continuous Anode Assembly
In MATCOR’s deep anode assembly system, Durammo™, a continuous wire that is fed from a cable at each is used in lieu of many individual anodes. In order to create electrical redundancy, factory connected jumper cables are installed to the wire anode every ten feet. This arrangement effectively eliminates risk of mutual anode interference.

Additionally, MATCOR’s Durammo™ Anode System is made with MMO as opposed to graphite or high silicon cast iron to create a light, stable anode that has the capability of operating at higher current densities. They also use MATCOR’s Super-Vent™ pipe assembly to enhance overall venting capability and cabling with a chlorine-resistant PVDF layer for protection.

Overall, for deep well systems with outputs under 75 amps, MATCOR’s Durammo™ technology provides superior value through several performance enhancements and greater longevity.

To learn more about MATCOR’s Durammo™ continuous anode system contact MATCOR or learn more about MATCOR’s other cathodic protection products.

MATCOR Launches Linear Anode Specific for HDD – Iron Gopher™

The Only Linear Anode Designed Specifically for Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) Applications 

CHALFONT–September 4–MATCOR, Inc. the trusted full-service provider of proprietary cathodic protection products (for example: linear anode), systems and corrosion engineering solutions, introduces Iron Gopher™, another first in a long series of MATCOR innovations for the cathodic protection industry.

Linear Anode
Introdroducing Iron Gopher™ The only anode designed specifically for Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) application

“In direct response to our clients’ needs, MATCOR designed a linear anode system specifically for the stresses of Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) environments. The Iron Gopher™, which is ready to install upon delivery to the job site, is an elegant solution to a difficult problem.  The strength of the Iron Gopher™ is unmatched in the market,” said Doug Fastuca, President of MATCOR, Inc.

“We recently installed several thousand feet of MATCOR’s Iron Gopher™ linear anode at an HDD project.  With its unique design and greatly increased strength, the product is superior to anything in the market for HDD applications.  The HDD installation went exceptionally well and the linear anode is performing as expected.  We were excited to work with MATCOR and expect to come back to the Iron Gopher™ for future HDD projects,” said Michael Pearce, Corrosion Program Manager, Colonial Pipeline Company.

The patent-pending Iron Gopher™ features a rugged stainless steel outer jacket for greatly increased pulling strength in HDD installations.  The Iron Gopher™ utilizes MATCOR’s proven SPL™–Anode as its core and adds a patent-pending, high-strength stainless steel overbraid, a proprietary aluminum nosecone and a pulling-cable assembly to create a system with superior strength.  In addition, the Iron Gopher™ utilizes the patented Kynex® connection technology to ensure waterproof connections in the anode.

For further technical and product information about the Iron Gopher™ contact your MATCOR Account Manager, visit or call (US. & Canada) 1 800-215-4362 (Worldwide) +1-215-348-2974.


MATCOR, Inc. is a leading cathodic protection and corrosion prevention engineering design firm, providing environmentally beneficial systems and services to global clients for nearly 40 years. An ISO 9001:2008 certified expert in the field of cathodic protection, MATCOR offers proprietary corrosion protection design, engineering, manufacturing, installation, cathodic protection testing, annual surveys, maintenance and complete corrosion protection project management. We specialize in protecting the infrastructure of the oil and gas, utility, transportation and construction industries. To learn more about MATCOR, please visit or call 1-800-523-6692.

Pipeline Cathodic Protection News: New Spectra Natural Gas Pipeline Construction

Pipeline cathodic protection industry received a boost this week: proposed high-volume natural gas pipeline construction across 3 Southeastern states. Spectra, the company behind this jolt of economic opportunity, has dubbed it the “Renaissance Project”. The natural gas pipeline proposes several lines branching off the main pipeline to potential customers along the route.

The pipeline is a complex project and will require a number of business services such as pipeline cathodic protection. MATCOR’s pipeline protection program uses a number ISO 9001:2008-certified solutions to protect such a project. For example, MATCOR’s SPL™-FBR linear Anode and Durammo™ Deep Anode System would help lower total cost of ownership on the pipeline.

The proposed pipeline is almost 300 miles with three different pipeline diameters. The natural gas pipeline will feature two compressor stations to maintain line pressures, according to officials. It was stated the line will have a capacity of 1 billion cubic feet per day, and can be expanded to over 1.5 billion cubic feet per day.

Spectra plans for the pipeline to run from the Chattanooga, Tennessee area, through Alabama and towards the Atlanta, Georgia area. “We are continuing to work with multiple potential customers to design a project to fit their supply demand needs,” Grover said in a statement on the project.

Furthermore, Spectra executed letter of intent with the AGL, the parent company of Chattanooga Gas Co., and Atlanta Gas Light explore a joint arrangement for local distribution. Sources close to the matter state the “Renaissance Project” could be up and running by mid-2017.

“From a project kickoff standpoint, we continue to reach out to federal, state and local public officials informing them of the project,” she said. “We’ll send letters and start contacting landowners along our proposed study corridor pending further market feedback.” Grover stated Spectra the Renaissance Project study corridor map is in the final stages. Currently, the map highlights 15 counties across Tennessee, Alabama and Georgia.

Economic groups across these states laud the move as one that will stimulate the economy and bring jobs to the region. “It’s going to be a good project and the infrastructure for natural gas is such that, industry-wide, there’s a great demand for it,” one source familiar with the matter said. Experts familiar with the project say it is a crucial move to support industrial expansion and business growth in the region.


MATCOR’s Insight That Works

The Renaissance pipeline is indeed poetically named. The Southeastern region has recently seen improvements to its economic state and industrial competitiveness. However, key investments such as the natural gas pipeline and other infrastructure must be put in place to attract jobs, manufacturers and families into these committees. That said, the pipeline is a key cog to the continued rebirth of this region. MATCOR and other service providers will be stewards of this bright future, protecting valuable assets that power communities.


MATCOR is a leading provider of ISO 9001:2008-certified cathodic protection for pipelines and cathodic protection management. Our team maintains the highest quality standards of cathodic protection for systems for storage tanks and other products that let you focus on your business operations.

Natural Gas Transmission Pipelines & Safety: Major Washington Expansion

The Washington State natural gas transmission pipelines and safety landscape received a big announcement this week. Multiple sections of pipeline in Washington will be expanded, according to federal filings by Northwest Williams Pipeline.

The current gas transmission pipelines are 30 inches. The proposed expansion will place 36 inch pipeline next to the old 30 inch pipeline. The construction, expected in early 2017, will also create continuity between existing 36 inch pipeline. The pipeline expansion is a perquisite for a new liquefied natural gas (LNG) export station in Astoria. The project will encompass a wide range of work, including natural gas pipeline safety and protection.

In total, the pipeline project will span 140 miles from the Oregon state and Canadian national borders. The Oregon Pipeline Company will connect the southern expansion into Oregon through an installation underground the Columbia River. The finished product is LNG that will be shipped to Asia from the Astoria natural gas terminal.

Northwest Williams Pipeline estimates the project cost at $870 million. Upon completion, the pipeline will be made available to other customers in the Northwest, including Washington and Oregon. The company also stated it expects the pipeline to generate over $10 million in property taxes, per year across Washington.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) received the application request in June. FERC officials have announced the plan will be reviewed in tandem with the Oregon LNG pipeline plans.


MATCOR’s Insight That Works

The proposed pipeline expansion holds a great deal of promise for all involved. The Astoria LNG terminal is poised to service rapidly expanding markets in Asia.  Northwest Williams Pipeline will help bring a great deal of economic benefit to Washington. At the same time, the project is highly complex by joining multiple existing pipeline sections. Natural gas pipeline safety and pipe protection are large concerns. The company is making a large investment that will require expert cathodic protection to secure continued profit. Technology such as linear SPL anodes could make a huge impact for Northwest Williams Pipeline.


MATCOR is a leading provider of ISO 9001:2008-certified cathodic protection management. Our cathodic protection installation team offers turnkey project management for many corrosion engineering services, including AC Mitigation. MATCOR’s cathodic protection equipment is backed by an unmatched 10 year guarantee.

Marcellus Shale Gas Impact Fee Proceeds Above $400M

HARRISBURG – Gov. Tom Corbett has announced that the Marcellus Shale Impact Fee, part of Act 13, signed into law in February of 2012, has brought in more than $400 million dollars in its first two years.

“Act 13 is a law that has helped bring Pennsylvania forward both economically and environmentally,” Corbett said. “In addition to enacting some of the most rigorous environmental standards in the nation, we’ve brought in more than $400 million for our communities directly impacted by unconventional drilling, along with other environmental efforts across the state.”

“As this industry grows, benefitting all Pennsylvanians with thousands of new jobs, lower energy prices, and increased energy independence, Act 13 has played a key part in our role making sure that it grows safely and responsibly,” Corbett said.

Collections for 2012 were due to the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC) by April 1.

Nearly $198 million is expected to come into the state from the 2012 collections. This is in addition to the $204 million collected during the first round of collections. The 2012 amounts were released yesterday.

The collections this year are slightly lower than last year due mainly to the lower price of natural gas.

Information on the amount of money expected for 2012, as well as the amount of money collected to date, can be found on the Act 13 page on the PUC’s website,


Major expansion of natural gas pipeline

$44 million project would put 5.6-mile line through Bucks County, PA.

One of MATCOR’s key clients Texas Eastern Transmission LP, is seeking federal approval of a $5.3-million expansion of its pipeline and compressor station system to distribute Marcellus shale gas produced locally by Chevron and EQT.

A subsidiary of Spectra Energy Transmission, of Houston, Texas, Texas Eastern wants to gain Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) approval in November this year and put the new pipelines into service by November 2014, according to a pre-application filing recently submitted to FERC.

The project involves installing a total of 33.6 miles of new pipeline in five counties in the state; upgrading four compressor stations in the state and other work at 41 company facilities between Pennsylvania and Mississippi.  MATCOR has the ability to provide its SPL Mixed Metal Oxide Linear Anode to cathodically protect this pipeline expansion.

“Texas Eastern’s (pipeline) runs from the Gulf of Mexico to Lambertville, N.J. This is an expansion of that system,” said Spectra spokeswoman Marylee Hanley.

Texas Eastern has agreements with Chevron and EQT to charge them for the work, which would provide both producers with the capacity to transport 300,000 additional Btu/d.

These two shippers are major producers in the Marcellus shale play need the project to ensure that pipeline capacity exists to transport their gas to markets as the production comes on line. The shippers have agreed to pay negotiated rates for the pipeline service, according to Texas Eastern’s FERC filing.

“We are an open access pipeline, which means we are required to provide service to our customers,” Hanley said.

The new pipelines would be installed adjacent to existing pipelines in existing rights of way, and all the compressor station work would be done on the stations’ existing property, she said.

Specifically, the project would transport 300,000 Btu/d of gas from western Pennsylvania to the eastern end of the system in Lambertville, N.J., and Staten Island, N.Y.; 50,000 Btu/d from western Pennsylvania to the Lebanon, Ohio, hub and 250,000 Btu/d of of gas from western Pennsylvania to markets in Mississippi and Louisiana.

In addition to providing access to markets for the producers, the project would promote commodity price competition and reduce price volatility by introducing new supply sources from the Appalachian production area, particularly the prolific Marcellus shale, to these market areas, Texas Eastern said. The project would also provide gas to developing markets in the Gulf Coast Region and improve the company’s transportation security, flexibility and reliability, according to the filing


Canada to Build Oil Pipeline to Serve Asia

‘The U.S. market will not be large enough to accommodate all of Canada’s oil exports,’ said Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver.

Canada is scrambling to build an expansive new oil pipeline network to reach new markets including Asia as its sole customer, the United States, hikes production, aiming to become the world’s top exporter.

Canada holds the third-largest oil reserves in the world but 98% of its oil exports and 100% of its natural gas shipments go the United States. This has made Canada the top energy supplier to its neighbor.

But that could soon end.

The United States is seeing a boom in shale gas and offshore oil production as it strives for energy independence, and the International Energy Agency recently said the U.S. could become the world’s top oil producer by 2020.

This week, Canada’s Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver urged a fix: build more pipelines to move oil from landlocked Alberta province to both refineries in eastern Canada and the Pacific coast to fill tankers bound for Asia.

“The U.S. market will not be large enough to accommodate all of Canada’s oil exports,” Oliver said.

“By 2035, Canadian oil exports will be 4 million barrels per day, but total US imports will only be 3.4 million barrels per day. This highlights the need for Canada to access new markets,” Oliver added.

The federal government has put its weight behind several new pipeline projects, but the initiatives face stiff opposition from environmentalists and regional authorities.

“We’re already lacking outlets for the oil now being produced — existing pipelines are at capacity,” said Marco Navarro-Genie, a researcher at Calgary-based Frontier Centre for Public Policy.

“We’re forced to sell our oil at $22 below market value because we can’t get it to any market outside of North America,” Navarro-Genie said.



Keystone XL pipeline concerns are being addressed

A state agency has issued its preliminary review of the Keystone XL pipeline that appears to indicate most concerns are being addressed.

The draft evaluation report, released Tuesday afternoon by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality, concluded that the new route of the controversial crude-oil pipeline successfully avoids the Sand Hills region of Nebraska, a step agreed to during a special session of the Legislature last year.

The report also stated that pipeline developer TransCanada Inc. had, by making some minor changes to the pipeline route in August, addressed concerns raised by the agency about crossing areas of sandy soils or areas near municipal drinking-water supplies of two small communities, Clarks and Western.

The agency also said TransCanada has agreed to compile an emergency response plan for leaks that might occur in the 36-inch, high-pressure pipeline, and buy $200 million in third-party liability insurance policy to cover any clean-up costs.

The company has provided the state with a chemical makeup of several forms of crude oil that will be shipped through the pipeline, which will carry 30 million gallons of oil a day. The exact composition of the oil, the agency said, will be made immediately available in the event of a leak.

Environmental groups, including Bold Nebraska and the Sierra Club, have raised concerns about the lack of information about the chemical makeup of diluted bitumen that will be carried by the pipeline.

While Tuesday’s draft report doesn’t raise “concerns” like those this summer about sandy soils and drinking-water wells in the path of the pipeline, he said it does “point out the impacts on different kinds of terrain” that will be crossed by the pipeline.

A public hearing on the draft report will be held at 6 p.m. on Dec. 4 at the Boone County Fairgrounds in Albion, Neb. Linder encouraged the public to comment on the report, either at the meeting or by mail or email.

A final report will be issued after the hearing. Gov. Dave Heineman will have the final say on whether the state approves the pipeline’s route across Nebraska.

That decision will be forwarded to the U.S. Department of State, which will make the final judgment on whether the entire Keystone XL project will be allowed. The project will transport oil from Canada’s tar sands region to the U.S. Gulf Coast, and pick up some oil from North Dakota and Montana along the way.

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Nigeria: Oil Spill Investigations ‘A Fiasco’ in the Niger Delta

The investigation process into oil spills in the Niger Delta has been challenged today by Amnesty International and the Centre for Environment, Human Rights and Development (CEHRD), as inconsistencies in Shell’s claims about sabotage were revealed.

Experts have examined evidence from the latest oil spill from Shell’s poorly maintained pipelines in the Bodo creek area and confirmed that it strongly indicates that the leak is due to corrosion of the pipeline. However, Shell appears to be ignoring the evidence of corrosion.

“The investigation process into oil spills in the Niger Delta is a fiasco. There is more investment in public relations messaging than in facing up to the fact that much of the oil infrastructure is old, poorly maintained and prone to leaks – some of them devastating in terms of their human rights impact,” said Audrey Gaughran, Director of Global Issues at Amnesty International.

Amnesty International and CEHRD asked US company, Accufacts, which has many years experience in examining oil infrastructure, to examine photographs of the pipe at the leak point. They stated: “This is apparently due to external corrosion. Notice the layered loss of metal on the outside of the pipe around the “stick” from pipe wall loss (thinning) due to external corrosion. It is a very familiar pattern that we have seen many times on other pipelines.”

“Shell have said locally that the spill looks like sabotage, and they completely ignore the evidence of corrosion. This has generated a lot of confusion and some anger in the community,” said Stevyn Obodoekwe, Director of Programmes at CEHRD. “We have seen the pipe and brought an expert to look at it, and it seems pretty clear it is corroded.”

Shell will now remove the affected length of pipe to a Shell facility where, according to the company, tests will be done.

Shell’s pipelines are old and many have not been properly maintained or replaced, with local people and NGOs reporting that the pipes in the Bodo area have not been replaced since 1958. When Amnesty International asked Shell to confirm the age and status of the pipes the company did not respond.

One year ago, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) issued a major report on the effects of oil pollution in the Ogoniland region of the Niger Delta. Little has changed, as this latest oil spill at Bodo demonstrates. Among its findings, UNEP confirmed that Nigerian regulatory agencies “are at the mercy of oil companies when it comes to conducting site inspections”. UNEP also found that Shell had failed to adhere to its own standards in relation to maintaining its infrastructure.

Thousands of oil spills have occurred in the Niger Delta since the oil industry began operations in the late 1950s. Corrosion of the pipes and equipment failure were responsible for the majority of spills. In recent years sabotage, vandalism and theft of oil have also contributed to pollution. However, corrosion and equipment failure remain very serious problems which have never been addressed.

Oil companies are responsible for ensuring that, as far as possible, their equipment is not vulnerable to tampering. However, Shell has not responded to request to for information on any measures it has taken to prevent sabotage and vandalism.

On 3 August Amnesty International and CEHRD published a report on an oil investigation at Bodo in June/July 2012. The report focuses on the lack of transparency in the process and the failure of shell to disclose any information on the condition or age of its pipes.

Since 2011 Shell has posted oil spill investigation data on its website. This move was welcomed by Amnesty International and CEHRD. However, as research by both organizations has made clear, the process on the ground remains highly problematic, and there is a lack of independence and transparency in the investigations themselves.


NTSB blame multiple corrosion cracks & ‘weak’ regulations – Kalamazoo Oil Spill

The National Transportation Safety Board blamed multiple corrosion cracks and “pervasive organizational failures” at the Calgary-based Enbridge pipeline company for a more-than-20,000-barrel oil spill two years ago near Michigan’s Kalamazoo River.

The cost of the spill has reached $800 million and is rising, the NTSB said, making the pipeline rupture the most expensive on-shore oil spill in U.S. history. The pipeline’s contents — heavy crude oil from Canada’s oil sands — have made the spill a closely watched case with implications for other pipelines carrying such crude.

The NTSB also blamed “weak federal regulations” by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration for the accident, which spilled at least 843,444 gallons of oil into a tributary of the Kalamazoo in Marshall, Mich. The oil spread into a 40-mile stretch of the Kalamazoo and a nearby wetlands area.

“This accident is a wake-up call to the industry, the regulator, and the public,” NTSB Chairman Deborah A.P. Hersman said in a statement.  She added that “for the regulator to delegate too much authority to the regulated to assess their own system risks and correct them is tantamount to the fox guarding the hen house.”

The spill began about 5:58 p.m. on July 25, 2010, when a 30-inch diameter pipeline ruptured. Twice, Enbridge workers tried to restart the pipeline after alarms about abnormal pressure in the line and 81 percent of the oil spilled over 17 hours after those alarms, the NTSB said.

“We believe that the experienced personnel involved in the decisions made at the time of the release were trying to do the right thing,” Enbridge’s chief executive, Patrick D. Daniel, said.“As with most such incidents, a series of unfortunate events and circumstances resulted in an outcome no one wanted.”

The case is being scrutinized by industry and environmental groups because it could threaten plans to build new pipelines to carry crude from Canada’s oil sands, or tar sands, into the United States. TransCanada’s controversial Keystone XL pipeline is one of the plans awaiting approval.

The NTSB, part of the Transportation Department, said the Enbridge pipeline break “was the result of multiple small corrosion-fatigue cracks that over time grew in size and linked together, creating a gaping breach in the pipe measuring over 80 inches long.”