Category Archives: Bridges

Corrosion under the Lincoln Street Bridge is prompting the City of Wichita to begin building a new bridge

Lincoln Bridge Closing Disrupts Local Fishermen

“I know they’ve got to do their job but it’s going to affect a lot of the good fishing down through there,” said Kenneth Snell, with a fishing rod in one hand, ready to fish south of the Lincoln Street Bridge.

Fishermen along the Arkansas River were not looking forward to finding new spots to make a catch.

“This is the best spot. The heads are taking it down from us but we could wait. We don’t have no other choice,” said Snell.

The 40-year-old bridge is located above a dam that has been wearing down the support and steel. City engineers said patching up the problems would be too costly.

“Even though the existing bridge could be repaired, we’ve done an economical analysis and found that it was more economical to construct a new bridge and then move the current dam out from underneath,” said Jim Armour, city engineer for the City of Wichita.

The new dam will be moved about 200 feet downstream from its current location. Engineers said the new dam will help stabilize river levels upstream.

“Although this won’t completely eliminate any flooding upstream, it’ll reduce the occasions of that,” said Armour.

Starting Monday, engineers will lower river levels. This is something engineers said will be helpful in the long-run.

“The citizens will see a lot more stability in the river level upstream once the new dam is completed,” said Armour. “I think this bridge will have a service life of 50 to a hundred years.”

Although fishermen didn’t like the move, they said they’re looking forward to a new bridge.

“Whenever they do get through it, I know it’ll look nice,” said Snell.

The Lincoln Street Bridge will be closed to pedestrians and motorists starting Monday. Traffic will be detoured using Harry Street, McClean Boulevard, and both Main and Market Streets.

The project is expected to be complete by the fall of 2012.

SOURCE: http://www.kake.com/news/headlines/Lincoln_Bridge_Closing_Disrupts_Local_Fishermen_123719869.html 

Network Rail Protecting Royal Albert Bridge from Corrosion

Around 50,000 new bolts are being used in Network Rail’s major project, which started in late May, to restore Brunel’s famous Royal Albert bridge that was built in 1859.

These bolts – as ‘precious and mighty as Brunel’s legendary golden rivet bolt’ – will be vital to keep the landmark structure strong for the next century and beyond.

The £10m improvement scheme will see engineers investing nearly 2m hours of work over the next two years to strengthen and repaint Royal Albert bridge, bringing it back to its former glory.

Around 35,000 litres of special paint will also be used to spruce up and protect the bridge’s steel façade from corrosion.

Mark Langman, route director for Network Rail said:

“We have a big task to transform the railway on Great Western in the coming years and the improvement on Royal Albert bridge plays a big part.

“The Royal Albert bridge remains a vital rail link and has carried more than 1 billion tonnes of rail traffic since it was built. This is the most complex refurbishment work ever and our work will inject a new lease of life and keep the landmark bridge robust for many years to come.”

To be carried out in five stages, the work will start concurrently from each end of the bridge and it is carefully designed to minimize disruption to the community and passengers.

The scaffolding will be encapsulated to create a contained safe working environment to prevent dust and debris from falling from the structure and to reduce any noise pollution.

The encapsulation is sealed to help reduce any noise and its roof is also pitched to prevent accumulation of rain water, which could add weight to the structure. In addition, the encapsulation will form a tunnel around the track, so that engineers can continue to access the structure when trains are running.

A large industrial vacuum cleaner will be used to remove all waste, including grit produced during the blasting process. This waste will be removed daily to prevent any contamination to the environment.

The structure was listed Grade 1 in 1952 by the English Heritage, which has also backed this project.

Engineers use Route 23 bridge in Wayne to study corrosion

WAYNE – An international team of engineers and researchers, each dressed in a yellow vest and hard hat, on Tuesday poked and prodded – so to speak – at a steel string bridge, looking for signs of deterioration & corrosion.

International engineers conduct a study of highway bridge deterioration using a bridge on Route. 23 in Wayne for the test.

As drivers whizzed by without giving thought to the condition of the structure, the engineers were unleashing a variety of high tech tools – ground penetrating radar, ultrasonic equipment and impact echoing technology – to aid them in evaluating the bridge deck that spans Route 23. The bridge carries traffic over Mountainview Boulevard in Wayne.
They are part of the “International Bridge Study,” a project organized by the Center for Advanced Infrastructure and Transportation at Rutgers University in June 2010. It brings together engineers and researchers from Japan, Switzerland, Austria, Korea, the United States and other nations to study the North Jersey bridge, according to Carl Blesch, a spokesman for Rutgers University.

Their purpose is two-fold. They are looking for ways to identify bridge corrosion early so that it can be treated earlier – when the cost is less expensive. They are also looking for ways to treat corrosion that extends the life of infrastructure in their own countries.

“We have no sustainable path forward to manage our infrastructure,” said Franklin Moon, an associate professor of structural engineering at Drexel University, a lead engineer on the project.

“If you want a public infrastructure system, someone has to pay for it. Public infrastructure costs more now than it has to cost,” he said. “We’re spending a lot of money on repairs we might not need to do if we can catch them early.”

Moon said there are 600,000 bridges in the nation and 66,000 in New Jersey. He said he believes agencies are spending more to maintain bridges than they need to because bridge repairs often do not occur until the deterioration has progressed significantly.

He said corrosion expands the rebar in the bridge and when it expands, it pops the concrete, creating a pothole. If the corrosion is detected earlier, it can be treated – with a corrosion inhibitor, for instance – which can prevent it from expanding, he said.

“It’s analogous to finding cancer early so you can deal with it,” he said. “Find cancer late and you’re in trouble … If you let that go to the point that it’s spalling and you’ve got potholes, now you’re out there with a jack hammer and replacing it.”

Moon said the New Jersey Department of Transportation selected the Wayne bridge to study because it is representative of 2,600 other bridges in the state. They all have similar drainage, deck quality and vibration issues, he said.

This bridge, which was built in 1983, handles about 73,100 vehicles a day, said Tim Greeley, spokesman for the state transportation department.

It was last inspected in July 2010, and “is in overall fair condition,” he said.

Greeley said all bridges 20-feet in length or longer are inspected at least every two years.

The teams will meet for a workshop June 14 and 15 to share findings and make recommendations.

SOURCE: http://www.northjersey.com/news/Engineers_use_Route_23_bridge_in_Wayne_to_study_corrosion.html