Category Archives: MATCOR

MMO Anode Technology: The latest in Cathodic Protection

MMO anode technology has taken over the cathodic protection industry and MATCOR has been on the forefront for the last 20 years. Ted Huck, our VP of International Sales was interviewed at the recent NACE Corrosion Conference. In this video he discusses MMO anode technology for cathodic protection systems and the importance of reliable anode to cable connections.

MMO Anode Technology

MMO anodes, or mixed metal oxide anodes are the latest technology in the corrosion industry. Mixed metal oxide anodes are lightweight and durable with a very low consumption rate. 

MMO anodes are a mix of metal oxide electrocatalysts. In the presence of a DC voltage source they cause an electrical reaction that generates cathodic protection current. Unlike conventional impressed current anodes that physically consume as part of the cathodic protection reaction (at rates measured in kg/amp-year), MMO anodes are dimensionally stable and do not consume. Instead, they have a long and predictable catalytic life. MMO anodes consist of a thin coating of the MMO catalyst over an inert lightweight titanium substrate and are available in a wide range of shapes and configurations.

Why Cathodic Protection Systems Fail

Waterproof Anode to Cable Connection to protects MMO anode cathodic protection systems
Kynex® Patented, Waterproof Anode to Cable Connection

The most critical component to any cathodic protection anode system is the connection of the anode to the cable that runs back to the power supply. Because the cable is part of the anode system, if it has any nicks or defects or is not water tight, that cable can become part of the anode and will very quickly consume. When that happens, the anode fails. So, with cathodic protection systems it is imperative to have the highest quality connections.

Typically, when a cathodic protection anode system fails, it is not the anode that fails, it is the anode connection that fails. MATCOR has developed a proprietary technology for connecting wire anodes to cable, called Kynex®. Wire anodes are the heart of a lot of our products and this proprietary anode technology is a huge leap forward in the reliability of these connections.

Cost-effective, Reliable Cathodic Protection Solutions

At the end of the day, for our clients, it’s all about delivering value. It’s providing a cost effective solution that’s going to serve them for a very long time. As a designer and manufacturer of cathodic protection anode systems, we are able to specifically address client needs with customized corrosion prevention solutions that provide:

  • Long life
  • Great economic value
  • Superior reliability

MATCOR Products and Services

MATCOR is one of the world’s leading cathodic protection companies. We design, manufacture, install and service cathodic protection systems for clients worldwide. MATCOR provides services to the pipeline, midstream and oil & gas industries, protecting assets such as pipelines, storage tanks, and compressor stations. We also do a lot of work in the power industries, petrochemical, and chemical industries. Anywhere where you have buried steel structures, we are there to stop corrosion.
We encourage you to contact MATCOR through our website where our corrosion specialists and engineers can provide a solution tailored to your needs.

Corrosion Industry Leaders MATCOR and CP Masters Join Forces

Chalfont, PA (Aug 31, 2015) – MATCOR, Inc., the trusted full-service provider of proprietary cathodic protection products, systems, and corrosion engineering solutions recently announced that the company has joined forces with CP Masters, Inc. The combined company will be known as MATCOR.

MATCOR_logoCP Masters brings 30 years of cathodic protection technical and system installation expertise to the MATCOR team. In addition to industry-qualified and experienced people, the company maintains one of the industry’s largest fleets of construction equipment.

This move enables MATCOR to execute cathodic protection and AC mitigation projects directly and efficiently. Additional benefits to customers include:

  • Improved cost-effectiveness
  • Consistent, high quality construction and installation services
  • Access to expert, conveniently located survey teams
  • Turnkey cathodic protection and AC mitigation solutions

“CP Masters and MATCOR have over 70 years of combined name recognition in the industry—with CP Masters known for superior construction and installation services, and MATCOR known for engineering expertise and proprietary products,” said Kevin Pitts, President of MATCOR, Inc. “Now as one company, we are able to offer customers a powerful combination of the best people, services and products in the corrosion industry.”


3 Cathodic Protection Methods for New Plant Construction

Plant Piping Cathodic Protection Overview

Linear Anode Cathodic Protection for Plant PipingCathodic protection, when applied properly is an effective means to prevent corrosion. For many underground applications, such as pipelines, cathodic protection system design is relatively straightforward. Plant and facility environments, however, are not simple applications. Plants have congested underground piping systems in a tightly spaced footprint. The presence of copper grounding systems, foundations with reinforcing steel embedded in concrete, conduit, utility piping and structural pilings (either bare or concrete with reinforcing steel) can greatly complicate the task of designing a cathodic protection system.

For simple plant facilities, it is possible to isolate the piping and utilize a conventional galvanic corrosion prevention system. This works only if the plant piping is electrically isolated from other underground structures for the life of the facility. For most plant and facility applications, it is not practical to isolate the piping from the grounding system for the life of the facility. In these cases an impressed current anode system is the only alternative.

3 Cathodic Protection Methods for Underground Piping and Structures

There are three basic approaches to cathodically protect underground piping and structures using impressed current anodes.

  1. Deep Anode

    One method is the deep anode in which high current capacity anodes are installed from the structure in a deep hole drilled vertically 150+ feet deep. This is analogous to lighting a football field with floodlights.

  2. Shallow Anode or Distributed Anode Bed

    Another method is to use a shallow ground bed anode design where many smaller capacity ground bed anodes are spaced near the intended structures – analogous to street lamps lighting a street.

  3. Linear Anode

    The third method is to place a linear anode parallel to and in close proximity to the piping to be protected discharging current continuously along its length – similar to fiber optic lighting.

This technical bulletin details the advantages of using the linear anode approach for new plant construction projects to protect buried piping in a congested environment. This approach provides the most effective solution both technically and commercially.

Plant and Facility Cathodic Protection Design Issues

Electrical Isolation in a Congested Plant Environment

Electrical isolation is a major concern when designing a CP system for any plant or facility application. Isolating a single cross country pipeline segment from point A to point B is achieved rather simply through the use of electrical isolation flanges/isolation joints that the pipeline operator maintains and tests regularly. The realities of power plant piping networks, on the other hand, significantly complicate electrical isolation. By code, everything above grade in a plant must be grounded, yet it is common to see cathodic protection systems designed based on isolation of the buried piping. Even if electrical isolation is achieved during the plant construction, maintaining electrical isolation over the life of the facility may not be realistic. Given the speed and complexity with which new plants are erected, achieving electrical isolation during construction is no simple task. Once installed, electrical isolation flange kits require regular monitoring and periodic replacement that often does not occur. Piping modifications and other plant maintenance activities can also result in an inadvertent loss of electrical isolation. Cathodic protection design that relies on electrical isolation should be avoided for plant applications.

Current Distribution – a Critical Issue in Cathodic Protection Design

Another critical issue that must be properly considered during the design of a CP system for plant applications is the highly congested underground environment and the challenges of achieving thorough current distribution. Buried piping is often located in congested underground areas in close proximity to grounding systems, foundations with reinforcing steel, pilings systems, metallic duct banks and other structures that can shield current from the piping systems that are the intended target of plant cathodic protection systems. It is virtually impossible to assess where current will go in a plant environment – the more remote the anode source, the more difficult it is to assure appropriate current distribution.

Stray Current

When discussing current distribution, it is also important to discuss the potential for stray current. For grounded systems, current that is picked up by other buried metallic structures is merely current that is wasted and not available to protect the intended buried piping structures. For isolated metallic structures, such as foreign pipelines, ductile iron piping systems, and nearby facilities or structures, stray current may be a significant concern. Stray current problems occur when current is picked up on an isolated structure and later discharges off that structure and back to a grounded structure. At the location where stray currents discharge, rapid corrosion may be inadvertently induced on the isolated structure.

The Case for Linear Anode Cathodic Protection System Design

The linear anode solution consists of long runs of linear anode installed parallel and in very close proximity to the piping being protected. The current output is kept very low and is generally consistent across the entire system. A linear anode is in effect a distributed system with an infinite number of anodes spaced continually. This system provides the best technical cathodic protection solution and minimizes the current output required as follows:

  • Does not require electrical isolation.
    Because the linear anode is closely located next to the piping being protected, electrical isolation is not a significant concern. The anode is “closely coupled” to the piping and operates with a very low anode gradient that minimizes any losses to nearby structures including grounding.
  • Assures good current distribution as the anode runs parallel to the piping being protected.
    The linear anode cathodic protection system design eliminates any requirement for supplemental anodes to address areas where remote anodes may be shielded after the CP system is commissioned. Wherever the piping goes, the linear anode follows in the same trench. This also makes it very easy to adapt the design during piping revisions that may change the piping system routing as the plant construction proceeds.
  • Eliminates risks of stray current.
    Close proximity to the piping being protected significantly limits current losses to other structures and virtually eliminates shielding and stray current concerns. This also significantly reduces the total current requirements for the system, reducing the rectifier requirements.
  • Access issues – the linear anode is installed in very close proximity to the piping that is to be protected.
    This minimizes the risk of third party damage and reduces trenching required for buried cable. If installed in conjunction with the piping, the anode can be placed in the same trench as the piping affording the anode protection by the piping itself from external damage. This is a very cost effective cathodic protection installation when installed concurrently with the piping.
  • Ease of installation – when installed alongside the piping as the piping is being installed, the installation is simply a matter of laying the anode cable in the trench.

Our experts are happy to answer your questions about your plant piping cathodic protection system design.

Contact a Corrosion Expert

MATCOR Profiled in India Corrosion Publication

MATCOR Profile in Coatings and Anti-Corrosion Engineering Review, Apr/May 2015 issueThank you to Abraham Mathai at Coatings and Anti Corrosion Engineering Review for the profile about MATCOR and our 40th anniversary in the April/May 2015 issue!

MATCOR was founded in 1975 by William R. Schutt when he set out to develop a high quality, reliable source for cathodic protection products and equipment. The company designed and provided the first commercial cathodic protection system for reinforced concrete bridge decks that same year. The company has grown to offer a broad portfolio of proprietary cathodic protection and AC mitigation products, in addition to complete corrosion engineering services.

In March of 2015, MATCOR was acquired by Brand Energy & Infrastructure Services (Brand). Brand also owns CP Masters, Inc., a leader in the design and construction of cathodic protection and corrosion control prevention in the North American energy markets.



MATCOR is a BrandSafway company, in business for over 40 years protecting major infrastructure assets such as oil, gas and water pipelines, above ground storage tanks, power plants, energy facilities, deep wells and steel-in-concrete structures. MATCOR is a turnkey ISO 9001:2015 certified provider of customized cathodic protection products and systems combined with high-quality corrosion engineering, installation and maintenance services. MATCOR is headquartered in Chalfont, PA, and has field service offices in Guthrie, OK, Pittsburgh, PA and Houston, TX, as well as a growing list of international distributors.

More About MATCOR

MATCOR, Inc. Acquired by Brand Energy & Infrastructure

Chalfont, PA (Mar 9, 2015) – MATCOR, Inc., the trusted full-service provider of proprietary cathodic protection products, systems, and corrosion engineering solutions, announced last week that the company has been acquired by Brand Energy & Infrastructure Services (Brand). Brand also owns CP Masters, Inc., a leader in the design and construction of cathodic protection and corrosion control/prevention in the North American energy markets.

“This is an exciting time for MATCOR as we celebrate 40 years in business and move into a new chapter for the company,” said Douglas Fastuca, President of MATCOR. “Under the ownership of Brand and our new relationship with CP Masters, MATCOR is in an excellent position to better serve its customers in the US and internationally.”


About Brand Energy & Infrastructure Services

Brand Energy and Infrastructure Services is a premier provider of integrated specialty services to the global energy, industrial and infrastructure markets. Its extensive portfolio of specialized industrial service offerings includes cathodic protection, work access, coatings, insulation, refractory, formwork & shoring, specialty mechanical services, and other related crafts. Brand delivers its services through a network of more than 240 branches, with a particular focus on the major hydrocarbon and power generation markets globally. For additional information visit

New Pipeline Announced as Bakken Oil Production Rises

A new pipeline has been announced that will dramatically expand the exportation capacity of oil and natural gas by pipeline to handle increased Bakken oil production out of North Dakota.

Enterprise Products Partners LP proposed the new pipeline on June 24, 2014, which will be the first pipeline to move oil from North Dakota to a storage hub in Cushing, Oklahoma. The pipeline will be 1,200 miles and have the capacity to transport 340,000 barrels per day.

Enterprise is hoping to succeed where other companies have failed. Since 2012, five companies have proposed pipelines: Enterprise, Enbridge, ONEOK Partners LP, Koch Pipeline Co LP and Energy Transfer Partner. Of those, only pipelines from Enterprise and Enbridge are currently moving forward.

Bakken Oil Production Outpacing Infrastructure

Oil and natural gas production in North Dakota has steadily increased over the past few years, as the current infrastructure supporting this economic boon is struggling to keep up with demand.

Currently, between 60-70 percent of the production out of North Dakota is being shipped by rail. This delivery method is less reliable than pipelines and recent train accidents highlight the dangers of shipping oil by rail.

The pipeline proposed by Enterprise will have the capacity to ship half the crude currently being shipped by rail.

“As production increases in the Bakken Formation, the stress on existing infrastructure becomes immeasurably exacerbated,” said Kevin Groll, director of project management for MATCOR. “The new pipeline project by Enterprise represents an opportunity to expand this infrastructure moving into the future.”

“It is vital that these new pipeline projects take the necessary steps to protect the significant investment in oil pipelines through the implementation of cathodic protection products and services like those offered by MATCOR.”

What Is Cathodic Protection?

Cathodic protection is a technique used to prevent the corrosion of metal surfaces. MATCOR uses a mixed metal oxide anode system that has become an industry standard in cathodic protection.

With Bakken Oil Pipeline, Enterprise Goes Where Others have Failed,” Reuters, June 24, 2014.

Bakken Oil News: June Sees Big Bakken Formation Infrastructure Investment

Bakken Oil News: June Sees Big Bakken Formation Infrastructure Investment
Earlier this month, Summit Midstream announced new investments into vital Bakken formation infrastructure.

In recent Bakken oil news, Summit Midstream Partners LLC announced a $300 million investment in Bakken Formation infrastructure. This prosperous region of North Dakota has rapidly become one of the most vibrant energy producing regions in the United States.

On June 11, Summit Midstream Partners committed to four new projects in the North Dakota counties of Williams and Divide, located in the northwest region of the state. The investment is representative of the swift growth of the Bakken Formation as a national energy leader.

The announced infrastructure projects included 240 miles of new pipelines to be constructed by Tioga Midstream, a subsidiary of Summit Midstream. The new pipelines will originate in Williams County, North Dakota for the transportation of crude oil, water, and natural gas. The development will expand daily shipping capacity to 20,000 barrels of crude oil and 14 million cubic square feet of natural gas.

Additionally, Meadowlark Midstream Co., a subsidiary of Summit Midstream, is working to construct a 47-mile pipeline to service a crude oil storage facility on the Stampede Rail Connection operated by Global Partners LP.

“The crude oil transportation system being developed by Meadowlark further expands our gathering capabilities in the Bakken region, providing our customers with even greater access to refineries and other downstream distribution points on both the East and West Coasts,” said Eric Slifka, president and chief executive officer of Global Partners.

As more oil and natural gas is shipped from the Bakken region of North Dakota, industry safety standard becomes increasingly important. MATCOR, a turnkey cathodic protection design and solutions company, provides solutions to protect vital oil and gas infrastructures.

“With every new investment in Bakken’s infrastructure, the importance of cathodic protection becomes more essential,” said Nick Judd, director of field operations for MATCOR.

“Increased capacity of new pipelines creates a vast network that may be vulnerable to rust and deterioration over time. MATCOR’s patented technology represents the highest quality cathodic protections on the market and we strive to keep this expanding region productive and safe today, tomorrow, and in the future.”

MATCOR is a provider of customized cathodic protection systems across infrastructure industries including oil and gas, water, and power. MATCOR leads the industry in cathodic protection services for detection, diagnosis and prevention of corrosion in pipelines.

Summit Announces $300 Million Plan for Bakken Infrastructure,The Bakken Magazine, June 11, 2014.

Legislation Vital for Corrosion Protection of Public Infrastructure

On June 3, the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014 (WWRDA) was presented to President Obama after passing with bi-partisan support through both houses of Congress. Typically, the WWRDA is reauthorized every few years, but this marks the first time the legislation has been passed since 2007. This important legislation will fund infrastructure improvements to public water resources, including the implementation of corrosion protection to water pipes.

The WWRDA will also dramatically increase investment in U.S. public water infrastructure. In states like New Jersey, where the average age of underground water pipes is more than 70 years, this bill will go a long way to prevent the degradation and corrosion of invaluable national assets. The reauthorization will also lead to thousands of stable jobs, helping the long-term health of state economies across the nation.

NACE International, the world’s foremost professional organization in the corrosion control industry, lauded the bill for providing instrumental support and recommendations for the Army Corps of Engineers to advance key corrosion control measures in national infrastructures.

“This legislation provides businesses, Federal agencies, and the American public with clarity that there will be improvements to our waterway infrastructure for the foreseeable future,” said Bob Chalker, Chief Executive Officer of NACE International. “This is an important step forward.”

Cathodic Protection by Corrosion Engineering Experts

As water resources and infrastructure age, they fall at risk to the effects of corrosion. MATCOR, a Pennsylvania-based company specializing in cathodic protection products and corrosion engineering services, said it appreciated the steps taken by Congress to ensure the safety and viability of public pipelines.

“The passage of the Water Resources Reform and Development Act is a great step for public infrastructure in the US,” said Jeff Didas, pipelines practice lead for MATCOR. “In order to maintain the integrity of the public infrastructure in the United States, we must stay vigilant to prevent the constant threat of corrosion and wear.”

“NACE International is a global leader in corrosion prevention and we stand with them in congratulating Congress for passing this monumental piece of bipartisan legislation,” Didas said.

MATCOR provides a full range of corrosion protection services. Our staff of NACE certified specialists are experts in corrosion engineering and cathodic protection products. MATCOR leads the industry in cathodic protection services for detection, diagnosis and prevention of corrosion in pipelines.

Corrosion engineering can provide solutions to handle a full range of corrosion problems and unique situations. MATCOR has a suite of proprietary cathodic protection products and systems. Cathodic protection is a technique used to control the corrosion of a metal surface through the application of electric current.

NACE International Applauds House and Senate Passage of Bipartisan Water Infrastructure Legislation,” press release, May 22, 2014.

New Marcellus Shale Pipeline Projects

The Marcellus Shale, an enormous natural gas reserve in Appalachia, is dramatically altering the traditional landscape of America’s natural gas industry.

Stretching across almost 100,000 square miles, the Marcellus Shale is the largest natural gas supply in the U.S. and second in the world. The depth and width of the Marcellus Formation vary, but studies indicate the shale’s deepest and thickest points are located in northeastern Pennsylvania, making it a prime area for drilling.

Estimates of the amount of recoverable natural gas in the reserve have varied over the years. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the Marcellus Shale produced 3.9 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of recoverable natural gas in 2013– accounting for 18% of the country’s natural gas. In August 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated the Marcellus shale will ultimately generate a total of 84 TcF of technically recoverable natural gas, a massive jump from its 2002 prediction of two trillion cubic feet.

Pipelines Under Pressure

As the Marcellus Shale’s natural gas production increases, so does the need for an efficient, modern, sophisticated pipeline system to transport the natural gas to various regions around the country. In 2012, Marcellus’ booming natural gas output caused pipelines to bottleneck. Such high load conditions inflict stress on pipelines essential to the country’s natural gas delivery system.

The following year, pipeline constraints were a major contributing factor to exorbitant natural gas prices in the Northeast region. The rest of the country was not exposed to the increased costs due to adequate pipelines with few constraints.

To help alleviate stress on current infrastructures, The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) approved three pipeline projects in February 2014. The projects include Texas Eastern’s TEAM 2014 Project, Williams’ Constitution Pipeline, and Iroquois Pipeline’s Wright Interconnect Project. All three projects have in-service dates slated for 2015-2016.

Texas Eastern’s TEAM 2014 Project

Spectra Energy’s Texas Eastern Appalachia to Market Expansion 2014 (TEAM 2014) Project will add approximately 33.6 miles of 36 inch diameter pipeline loop to the existing Texas Eastern Transmission, increasing the existing system’s capacity by approximately 600 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d). Once complete, the Texas Eastern system will deliver natural gas from Appalachia to the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest and Gulf Coast regions. The technologically advanced TEAM 2014 Project will be optimized for bidirectional flow.

Williams’ Constitutional Pipeline

The Constitution Pipeline is expected to measure 124 miles and have a diameter of 30 inches. The pipeline will transport natural gas from the Marcellus shale in northern Pennsylvania to areas in the northeastern U.S. It will have the capacity to transport 650 MMcf/d, fulfilling the daily needs of 3 million homes. The Constitution will be an “open access pipeline,” allowing local municipalities and public utility services to access the line.

Iroquois Pipeline’s Wright Interconnect Project

Iroquois’ Wright Interconnect Project (WIP) will work in tandem with the Constitutional Pipeline. Unlike the other projects approved by FERC, WIP is not a pipeline. It will update and expand Iroquois’ current compression facilities located in Wright, New York. The terminal will connect the Constitution to the Iroquois and Tennessee Gas Pipelines, facilitating the delivery of natural gas extracted from the Marcellus Play to New York and New England.

The Importance of Cathodic Protection

Propane storage tanks at MarkWest Energy Partners’ Houston fractionation and marketing complex in Washington, Pennsylvania.
Propane storage tanks at MarkWest Energy Partners’ Houston fractionation and marketing complex in Washington, Pennsylvania.

While the Marcellus Formation continues to produce high levels of natural gas, it is imperative that the operators for newly approved pipeline projects, as well as existing pipelines, storage tanks, and associated facilities take appropriate steps to protect their assets. Corrosion of metal surfaces is one of the most common and dangerous threats to midstream infrastructures. Cathodic protection is the most effective method of protecting against corrosion.

According to John Rothermel, Vice President of Sales at MATCOR, the leading cathodic protection company with expertise in protecting oil and gas pipelines from corrosion, the companies behind the Marcellus pipeline projects can’t afford not to protect their assets.
“As long as the Marcellus Shale continues to produce such unprecedented amounts of natural gas, the midstream infrastructure needed to get product to market will likely be running at full capacity, making it essential that these facilities operate reliably, efficiently and safely,” Rothermel said. “Designing and installing cathodic protection of pipelines into these projects helps to protect the significant investments being made, and helps to ensure these assets last well into the future.”

“Giant Marcellus shale coming of age” The Bismarck Tribune, March 20, 2014