Tag Archives: Eagle Ford

Kinder Morgan – Eagle Ford Pipeline Expansion Project

Kinder Morgan Energy Partners is adding 18 miles of lateral pipeline in the Eagle Ford Shale.

Kinder Morgan’s pipeline extension will carry crude and condensate from its DeWitt County, Texas station to a new facility it will build northwest in Gonzales County.

The company’s $74 million pipeline addition would allow it to reach markets along the Houston Ship Channel and a pipeline that services a Phillips 66 refinery in Brazoria County.

Kinder Morgan said Wednesday it struck a deal with a large producer in the Eagle Ford to extend the 178-mile pipeline in the South Texas shale play, but did not disclose the company.

The expansion provides “much needed optionality to Eagle Ford producers and Houston market consumers,” said Don Lindley, Kinder Morgan’s president for natural gas liquids business development, in a written statement.

The new pipeline will be able to transport 300,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day to the new station in Gonzalez County, which will have 300,000 barrels of storage capacity, a pipeline pump station and truck offloading facilities.

It’s a drop in the bucket for the Houston pipeline operator, which currently plans to invest $900 million in Eagle Ford projects and joint ventures. Kinder Morgan’s general partner, Kinder Morgan Inc., owns the largest pipeline network in North America at 80,000 miles, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Earlier this year, Kinder Morgan said it would expand another pipeline 31 miles from the DeWitt Station to a ConocoPhillips facility in Karnes County. That investment would amount to $107 million.

SOURCE: http://fuelfix.com/blog/2013/10/09/kinder-morgan-expanding-eagle-ford-pipeline-to-new-facility/

New Refinery Project for Texas – Eagle Ford Shale

Worldwide Energy Consortium, Inc. (WEC) announced it will begin the initial Engineering/Permitting phase for its new refinery located near Gardendale in La Salle County Texas. The site was chosen to take advantage of the oil production from the Eagle Ford Shale play, considered to be one of the largest Oil and Gas fields in the world.

This is the first of several planned operations by WEC in the region. Working closely with local officials, producers, land owners, and state agencies, WEC has identified multiple production sites that will allow it to take advantage of the abundant resources being developed in the area.

This first project, The Whitetail Refinery, will begin immediately. The facility is expected to be operational by the last quarter of 2014.

“The rapid deployment of modern, cost efficient refining operations directly into the new production regions will positively impact the producers, consumers, and the investors in our projects.” – Dave Martinelli, CEO Worldwide Energy Consortium, Inc.

MATCOR is a leading provider of ISO 9001:2008-certified cathodic protection products that project many refineries within the Eagle Ford Shale play. Learn more about our services and cathodic protection installation that carry a 10 year guarantee. MATCOR offers the latest insights on anodes for cathodic protectioncathodic protection equipment and more.

Expansion of Anadarko’s Natural Gas Plant – Eagle Ford Shale


MATCOR has learned that Anadarko is close to completing its new $100 million natural gas processing plant in Texas.

The Cathodically Protected Brasada plant will process natural gas produced from the company’s Eagle Ford shale wells.  Components like methane, ethane, propane and butane will be separated before they they are transported through the cathodically protected pipeline for further processing.

Anadarko’s plant is designed to process 200 million cubic feet of gas per day but can expand to process up to 400 MMcf/d.  This could lead to capacity expansion if Anadarko undertakes processing of third party gas at some point.

Although the Eagle Ford Shale region has a lot of potential for company’s such as MATCOR it cannot be optmized until the supporting midstream infrastructure comprising of gathering systems, pipeline and processing plants are developed to move oil and gas to to market.

Anadarko’s Eagle Ford Operations

Anadarko explores for shale oil and gas in a gross area of 400,000 acres in the Dimmit, LaSalle, Maverick and Webb Counties in the Eagle Ford region. Its current resources are estimated at over 600 million barrels of oil equivalent (MMBOE), 65% of which is estimated to be liquids. In 2012, the company achieved a gross processed production record of approximately 152,600 BOE per day. With its higher-margin oil and natural gas/condensate, the Eagle Ford shale region is among the most capital-efficient shale plays in Anadarko’s U.S. onshore portfolio.

Anadarko currently operates approximately 380 miles of oil and natural gas pipelines throughout the southwest Texas region, with additional gathering facilities that support more than 50% of its Eagle Ford shale production. In March 2012, Anadarko and Western Gas Partners began construction of the Brasada gas processing plant. The Brasada plant and the construction of an additional 200 miles of gathering lines will enhance the value of Anadarko’s Eagle Ford assets.

The Brasada Plant

All of Anadarko’s Eagle Ford acreage is located to the west of the Brasada plant, and a pipeline network will bring natural gas into the facility as well as move it off site to market. The pipeline will enable the company to eliminate its dependence on trucks. This will speed up transportation of its gas as there are too many trucks on the road in the region which causes a slowdown in the overall movement.

The Brasada plant also will also reduce flaring of methane in the field because Anadarko will be able to move it directly to market through pipelines. Flaring of methane is a common industry practice in cases where transportation is not viable.

From the plant, natural gas liquids will travel further through a pipeline to a plant in Yoakum and to fractionation facilities in Mont Belvieu, east of Houston. Gas also will go south to Corpus Christi, where it can be used in refining or fed into the existing network of interstate pipelines

Industry Challenges Texas Pipeline Ruling

Pipeline companies are asking the Texas Supreme Court to overturn a ruling they say jeopardizes new projects, escalating the battle over the costs of transporting oil and natural gas produced by the energy boom in South Texas.

The industry says its costs are soaring as landowners, bolstered by a recent appellate-court opinion, seek much higher payments for damage to their property values from pipelines and reject what they see as lowball offers from companies. Under Texas law, companies can build pipelines across private property over landowners’ objections, but must pay for use of the land and any damage to the value of the rest of the property.

The dispute in the South Texas case could have ramifications in other states where pipelines are proliferating along with new oil and gas fields, some legal experts say, as lawyers and appraisers build on arguments that have gained traction in court.

A year ago, an appellate court in San Antonio upheld a jury verdict against LaSalle Pipeline LP that awarded $600,000 to the Donnell family of McMullen County, Texas. The award was mostly for the loss of value to an 8,000-acre ranch after LaSalle built a natural-gas pipeline that stretched for four miles across the property.

LaSalle has appealed to the Texas Supreme Court, which has asked for briefs but not yet agreed to hear the case. Another pipeline company filed an amicus brief last month.

In the case, an appraiser hired by the family calculated the loss in value by studying sales of similar properties nearby, and found that those with pipelines sold for 20% less on average than those without pipelines.

A lawyer representing the family declined to comment on the case.

LaSalle didn’t dispute that it should pay for the rights to the 17 affected acres, but it said the pipeline didn’t diminish the value of the overall property at all. The Houston-based company argued that the landowner’s appraiser failed to consider factors besides a pipeline that could affect what people would pay for it, including location, shape and access to water.

LaSalle also maintained the landowner’s appraiser didn’t submit figures to the jury that would support his calculations.

Tom Zabel, a Houston lawyer representing LaSalle and other pipeline companies, said that costs to obtain rights of way have increased fivefold or sixfold in South Texas since the verdict in the Donnell trial.

In the Southwest alone, the Interstate Natural Gas Association of America estimates the region will need 50,100 miles of gathering pipelines, which take gas from wells to processing plants, between 2011 and 2020, 31% of the total nationally.

Energy Transfer Partners LP, a major pipeline operator that filed the amicus brief with the court in support of LaSalle, said that landowners, armed just with the appellate opinion, have argued in more than 20 condemnation hearings that pipelines would reduce their property values by at least 20%. Under state law, local panels hold hearings when pipeline companies sue landowners to obtain rights to build on their property.

Dallas-based Energy Transfer argued that if allowed to stand, the rationale affirmed in the appellate opinion would leave companies unable to “predict the costs associated with their projects and the viability of pipelines.”

Barry Diskin, a professor at Florida State University who has done work for pipeline companies, said he has never seen a study that found a systematic pattern in property values tied to pipelines. “I’ve not seen one, and I’ve looked,” he said.

But just the possibility of a major explosion is enough, in the real world, to depress property values near pipelines, said Marcus Schwartz, a lawyer in Halletsville, Texas, who represents landowners.

SOURCE: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203436904577153001395050804.html