Tag Archives: Williams

Gas pipeline connections start on Transco expansion

Written By Renée Kiriluk-Hill/Hunterdon Democrat at www.nj.com

Steps have been completed as work proceeds on the Transco pipeline expansion project in Franklin and Union townships in Hunterdon County.

In this area Williams Co. has completed pre-construction surveys, cleared and graded land, trenched — moving topsoil to separate mounds in agricultural areas — strung pipe near the trench.

According to the company, once pipe sections are welded together they are “placed on temporary supports along the edge of the trench. All welds are then visually and radiographically inspected. Line pipe, normally mill-coated or yard-coated prior to stringing, requires a coating at the welded joints. Prior to the final inspection, the entire pipeline coating is electronically inspected to locate and repair any coating faults or voids” before the pipe is placed in the trench and backfilling begins.

That is followed by testing the pipeline and restoration of the work area.

The pipeline is intended to supply the New York-area market with natural gas from the Marcellus Shale, primarily in Pennsylvania

SOURCE: http://www.nj.com/hunterdon-county-democrat/index.ssf/2013/04/pipeline_connections_start_on.html

Bluegrass Natural Gas Pipeline – Moving Forward!

Oklahoma’s Williams (NYSE: WMB) and Houston’s Boardwalk Pipeline Partners (NYSE: BWP) have teamed up to develop a new major natural gas pipeline, named the Bluegrass Pipeline, which would cut through Kentucky and connect gas fields underneath Pennsylvania to refineries and export markets on the Gulf Coast.

That means resources from the Marcellus Shale will now be accessible by facilities in Texas and Louisiana, which can then export them around the world. Kentucky.com reports that the pipeline, once completed, would allow for the initial transport of some 200,000 barrels of natural gas liquids per day from the shale operations in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia over to the facilities along the Coast. This capacity would later be upgraded to 400,000 barrels per day, chiefly by the addition of liquids-pumping capacity.

The venture also means wholly new facilities, both along the pipeline’s route and in the South where it terminates, would be constructed and developed, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports. Roughly 40 percent of the project proposal comprises new construction and development, and this is focused largely within the Marcellus region, though no exact locations have yet been decided upon.

An interconnect in Kentucky would connect to origin points of the pipeline located in Ohio and West Virginia. Also in Kentucky, an existing system will partially be reconfigured to allow for the transportation of natural-gas liquids, Kentucky.com reports. The final route the pipeline will follow has not been determined yet.

This project comes as the latest in a series of high-profile pipeline development efforts in and near the Marcellus Shale region, as companies try to exploit the lacking American pipeline infrastructure situation by building new networks that can handle the rush of shale-derived oil and natural gas (and related products), which the existing heavy crude pipelines cannot readily do.

In fact, the situation is so complex that some Marcellus and Utica shale producers have had to slow down their operations as they wait for the pipeline network infrastructure to play catch-up. But natural gas prices have dropped even further, so developers are showing more interest in liquids derived from natural gas, like condensate, ethane, and other natural-gas liquids, Kentucky.com reports, which could be sold in numerous markets both domestic and international.

According to Williams, the present system is likely to be under too much pressure as soon as 2016, with the total volume of natural-gas liquids being produced in the Northeast projected to go over 1.2 million barrels per day by 2020.

Kentucky.com quotes Williams President and CEO, Alan Armstrong:

“We are designing Bluegrass Pipeline to provide these two world-class resource plays with access to one of the largest and most dynamic petrochemical markets in the world,” Armstrong said. “This will help producers in Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia achieve an attractive value for their ethane and other liquids.”

The way Boardwalk and Williams envision this project is for the pipeline to deliver mixed natural-gas liquids from the shale zones in Ohio, W. Virginia, and Pennsylvania to numerous fractionation plants and storage centers. These have yet to be built, but they will be positioned along the pipeline’s route. They would subsequently link up with petrochem plants and end-product pipelines along the Texas and Louisiana coasts.

No costs have been cited yet, as those are part of the details still being worked out. The problem of moving the shale derivatives out of the Northeast and nearer to the refineries and other facilities is one of the U.S. shale sector’s biggest issues, and this project will undoubtedly do its part in alleviating the pressure.

Roughly 60 percent of existing pipeline can be used, according to Kentucky.com; this is mostly owned by Boardwalk, named the Texas Gas Pipeline. New construction would simply expand on this network. It would allow the project to possibly come online by or in the second half of 2015, while also keeping construction costs down.

Boardwalk has nearly 1,420 miles of natural gas pipeline networking through Western Kentucky and employs 315 out of its 1,200 employees within that state.

Prior to this development, Enterprise Products Partners LLP and Chesapeake Energy (NYSE: CHK) came up with a similar plan in 2011 to develop a pipeline that would transport ethane from the Marcellus Shale region, connecting it to refineries and facilities along the Gulf Coast. More such projects will need to be developed before the Appalachian shale bottleneck can see some real relief.

SOURCE: http://www.energyandcapital.com/articles/bluegrass-natural-gas-pipeline-approved/3192

Williams Partners seeks Transco Pipeline expansion to NYC

Williams Partners LP is seeking federal approval for an $182 million expansion of its Transco Pipeline to New York City, the Tulsa-based natural gas infrastructure company announced Monday.

The Rockaway Delivery Lateral Project would move about 647,000 dekatherms of natural gas per day to National Grid’s distribution system in the Brooklyn and Queens boroughs of the city, according to reports. Construction on the pipeline expansion, once approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, would begin late this year with service expected by the second half of 2014.

“The project would create an additional delivery point from the existing Transco system into National Grid’s distribution network, enhancing service reliability and serving growth in the region,” Frank Ferazzi, general manager of the Transco system, said in a statement.

“This project is critical to providing the additional natural gas supplies New York City needs.”

The 26-inch diameter Rockaway delivery project would include 2.9 miles of offshore and 0.3 miles of onshore pipeline.

Williams would utilize subsurface directional drilling in the sea-to-shore portion of the pipeline to avoid impacts to beaches and near-shore areas.

Last month, Williams Partners announced it would seek federal approval for a Transco natural gas pipeline expansion in Virginia and North Carolina.

The $298 million Virginia Southside Expansion, scheduled for service by 2015, would move 270,000 dekatherms of natural gas to the nearby markets.

The Transco Pipeline is a 10,500-mile interstate system bringing natural gas from the Gulf Coast to the Northeast. The system moves about 9.7 million dekatherms per day, with a dekatherm being equivalent to one million British thermal units of energy.

SOURCE: http://www.tulsaworld.com/business/article.aspx?subjectid=49&articleid=20130108_49_E1_Willia670452

Williams Partners gets FERC approval for pipeline

Williams Partners LP said Wednesday that it received federal approval for a $341 million expansion of the Transco natural gas pipeline, which should expand capacity in the Northeast by this time next year.

Williams said the project will expand the Transco Leidy Line and Transco mainline in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, to transport natural gas to the Northeast. It will add 12 miles of new pipe, mostly along existing pipeline routes, and a compressor facility in Essex County, N.J.

Construction of the compressor station begins this month, with pipeline construction starting in the spring. The new line should be in service by November 2013, the company said.

The project needed approval of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

SOURCE: http://www.businessweek.com/ap/2012-11-07/williams-partners-gets-ferc-approval-for-pipeline

Corrosion cited in Alabama pipeline explosion

A corroded pipe has been deemed the culprit of a massive natural gasoline explosion in Sweet Water, AL last December.

A Transco natural gas pipeline ruptured at approximately 3:07 p.m. Dec. 3 with an explosion that could be heard for more than 30 miles while shooting flames nearly 100 feet in the air for over an hour.

The pipeline was shutdown immediately after the failure as firefighters battled the blaze for the next 90 minutes.

“Although we have systems and processes in place to prevent and identify corrosion, our investigation indicated there were multiple factors working in conjunction that led to this problem not being recognized,” said Transco spokesman Chris Stockton. “Extremely corrosive soil conditions, combined with failures in the pipeline’s protective coating and cathodic protection system ultimately weakened the pipe, causing it to rupture.”

Stockton said the rupture forced the company to make several changes in its corrosion control program.

“These changes are designed to more closely monitor levels of pipeline protection from corrosion, assure a higher degree of protection equipment uptime, and provide higher standards for levels of corrosion protection,” he said. “We are also continuing our investigation into this failure to better enhance our corrosion control procedures in the future.”

Williams Gas and Pipeline has also been working under a PHMSA (Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration) Corrective Action Order, which details actions required to be completed to ensure the safety of the pipeline prior to putting the pipeline back in service. In addition, he said, the company is taking steps above and beyond regulation to ensure the pipeline is safe.

“All anomalies are being carefully investigated and any metal loss indications will be repaired prior to placing the pipeline back in service,” Stockton said. “Once all anomalies have been repaired, the pipe will be hydrostatically tested, which involves filling the pipe with water and pressure-testing it at considerably higher pressures than our normal operating pressures. Once all of these tests are complete, we will seek PHMSA’s permission to restore the line back to service.”

SOURCE: http://www.demopolistimes.com/2012/02/21/corrosion-cited-in-pipeline-explosion/