Category Archives: MATCOR

MATCOR receives two prestigious awards from the National Safety Council

MATCOR
MATCOR receives two prestigious awards from the National Safety Council

November 16, 2010 (Doylestown, PA) – MATCOR®, Inc. a full-service provider of proprietary cathodic protection products, systems, and corrosion engineering solutions announced today it has become the proud recipient of two highly regarded awards from the National Safety Council.

Safety and Compliance Manager, Rebecca Haring said ‘These National Safety Council awards recognize the lengthy period during which MATCOR employees went home without injury or illness caused in the workplace. We’re very proud of our safety record.”

National Safety Council
The two awards were presented to MATCOR at the National Safety Council’s Occupational Awards Ceremony.

The two awards were presented to MATCOR at the National Safety Council’s Occupational Awards Ceremony at the Philadelphia Convention Center on Tuesday, November 1, 2011.

The first award recognizes MATCOR’s Perfect Record where all units and/or facilities completed a period of at least twelve consecutive months without incurring an occupational injury or illness that resulted in days away from work or death.  MATCOR earned the award by working in excess of 293,030 employee hours.

As a result of earning the Perfect Record Award, MATCOR was recognized with another award for Exceptional Safety Performance in the Workplace.  The National Safety Council saves lives by preventing injuries and deaths at work, in homes and communities, and on the roads through leadership, research, education and advocacy.  MATCOR has been an active member of the National Safety Council since 2008.

About MATCOR
MATCOR, Inc. is a leading cathodic protection and corrosion prevention engineering design firm, providing environmentally beneficial systems and services to global clients for nearly 40 years. An expert in the field of cathodic protection, MATCOR offers proprietary corrosion protection products, installation, cathodic protection testing, maintenance and complete corrosion protection project management. MATCOR specializes in protecting the infrastructure of the oil and gas, electric utility, transportation and other infrastructure industries. 
To learn more about MATCOR, visit the new website at matcor.com or call 800 523 6692.

MATCOR hires experienced Houston based Account Manager Matthew Giardina

Doylestown, PA, November 9:  MATCOR, Inc. a full-service provider of proprietary cathodic protection products, systems, and corrosion engineering solutions announced today that  they have made another valuable addition to its sales team by bringing on board Houston based, Matthew Giardina.

MATCOR logo
MATCOR hires Matthew Giardina

Giardina joins the MATCOR team as one of the Regional Account Managers located in the Gulf Coast area.  Giardina’s responsibilities include providing account management leadership, and expanding MATCOR’s presence throughout the Gulf Coast, while focusing on the oil and gas markets.

“We are pleased that Matthew has become part of the MATCOR team.  His industry experience and desire to ensure our clients benefit from MATCOR products and services will allow him to be an asset in executing our sales strategies,” said Vice President of Sales & Marketing John Rothermel.

Giadina said, “I am excited and fortunate to work with MATCOR, and believe there is tremendous opportunity to grow MATCOR’s innovative product and services solutions.  MATCOR’s proprietary products are manufactured in-house and are unrivaled in the industry.  This gives me the opportunity to further develop the Gulf Coast market, and to help our clients achieve their corrosion prevention goals.”

Giardina brings almost seven years of experience working in the corrosion industry.  Most recently, he was responsible for growing national accounts with a leading coatings manufacturer.

About MATCOR
MATCOR, Inc. is a leading cathodic protection and corrosion prevention engineering design firm, providing environmentally beneficial systems and services to global clients for nearly 35 years. An expert in the field of cathodic protection, MATCOR offers proprietary corrosion protection products, installation, cathodic protection testing, maintenance and complete corrosion protection project management. MATCOR specializes in protecting the infrastructure of the oil and gas, electric utility, transportation and construction industries.

Stretching, Staffing and Pipeline Integrity Management

Pipeline Integrity Management
People who do not know MATCOR don’t yet recognize how highly qualified we all are in programmed corrosion prevention, and in reporting on the results

According to MATCOR’s Nick Judd, Houston-based corrosion engineer, “The company used to pick up less than 200 miles a year in pipeline integrity management (PIM) projects. Today, we are already doing more PIM; we’re growing to serve much more, and it’s no stretch to say we’ve got the capabilities.”

In deploying a broader range of experience-based capabilities, MATCOR knows that Pipeline Integrity Management is a crucial tool for operators and asset managers who have to do more in monitoring pipeline corrosion and assuring pipeline integrity. Judd maintains that MATCOR is present and accounted for in all the ways that reinforce the corporate theme, “Integrity that Works.”

“Today, everyone we hire is NACE-certified, starting with entry Level 1 and going through succeeding Levels 2 and 3,” he notes. “Our PIM professionals have to be Level 1 at least. We also staff with a mixture of graduate engineers in various disciplines and field-experienced personnel. Then we combine the two so we can go the extra distance for every PIM customer. Both Judd and MATCOR Executive Vice President Glenn Schreffler agree that the company’s personnel have to have both the “book learning” and the field experience to deliver effective PIM services.

“People who do not know MATCOR don’t yet recognize how highly qualified we all are in programmed corrosion prevention, and in reporting on the results,” says Judd.

The foundation is always NACE certification. Why? NACE has known for many years that there’s a need for supporting and reinforcing the integrity in corrosion prevention. NACE standards meet the needs of all segments of the infrastructure industry; they are written and approved by instructors and professors, government officials and regulatory experts, and especially by industry professionals…including some MATCOR experts. Judd maintains, “There need to be levels of testable knowledge leading to certification in corrosion, cathodic protection, and coatings and linings – this is part and parcel of our approach to PIM. So we make certain today that our technicians are NACE-certified by corporate mandate. Our internal OQ disciplines are just as rigorous.” (Judd is one of MATCOR’s Operator Qualification specialists as well.)

Integrity management of pipelines is an organized, integrated and comprehensive process that counters threats to pipeline safety. But as is now plain, PIM is about people. To be successful, MATCOR people not only meet widely recognized PIM standards but are able to apply them meticulously. “In PIM assignments, the crews I send out may have to meet weather challenges, or equipment difficulties – but never problems of applied knowledge or data acquisition or reporting.”

Effective PIM service delivery encompasses every one of the knowledge/data/reporting demands. “We carefully and successfully completed one ECDA (External Corrosion Detection Analysis) project for a very short segment of a customer’s pipelines, notes Judd. “We dotted every i, we crossed every t – we met and exceeded the expectations of the customer’s Corrosion Integrity Manager.”

“Even so, we were still pretty gratified when we got a callback from this customer, an opportunity to do more work, because our job performance was so good. Our new, larger project involves ICDA, (internal corrosion direct assessment), which also means extra computer modeling. I went over the PIM game plan with this customer and noted that we were going to need much more data to ensure success on this newer, large-scale project.”

“The customer agreed to help meet these requirements. And since he knows our data is superbly accurate, he is using the information we collect and analyze to revamp the alignment sheets on a 35-pipeline system.”

“This customer manager also feels that the MATCOR people working on this project understand the delicate differences among some of ‘his’ transportation system elements, which include gap and transmission mains, in-plant systems and distribution lines.”

“And for him – just as we’re doing for everyone now – MATCOR goes the extra distance, ensuring that we turn the data into analyses and report those within 48 hours of receiving the data.”

Whether MATCOR is conducting ECDAs, ICDAs, root cause analyses or ongoing maintenance and repair supervision, every element is documented and reported. So for MATCOR in PIM, there is an additional factor at work. “US Department of Transportation regulators are frequently on our sites,” says Judd, “closely monitoring how we actually conduct these processes and programs. We have an in-depth understanding of their reporting demands and we can use this savvy to help operators pass regulatory scrutiny with flying colors. It is one more level of reassurance – again supported by MATCOR’s multiple levels of experience and dedication to going the extra mile.”

For Judd, none of this is a stretch. His obligation to integrity reinforces the company’s. “Whenever I leave a meeting, I always want to be certain I have said the same things today that I said last year, and will continue to say next year, in terms of commitments made and delivered upon.”

“When MATCOR says, ‘We will do it,’ it’ll get done. Period.”

Nuclear Regulatory Commission responds to rare East Coast earthquake

When an earthquake hit Virginia Tuesday afternoon, nuclear power plants up and down the East Coast — including Exelon Nuclear’s Limerick Generating Station — began assessing if damage had occurred.

Part of the problem, however, may be that the place an earthquake is most likely to cause damage is also the place the hardest to inspect — underground.

Making that scenario more worrisome is a June investigative report by the Associated Press which found that as the nation’s nuclear fleet ages, much of its underground infrastructure, exposed to corrosion – and is constantly exposed to moist conditions, may be deteriorating even faster.

Assessing earthquake damage is not a simple operation given that “each plant has unique design specifications for seismic resistance,” according to Nuclear Regulatory Commission spokesman Neil Sheehan.

Called its “design basis,” each plant is “built to withstand the largest historical earthquake in the area, with additional margin on top of that,” Sheehan wrote in an email answering questions from Journal Register News Service.

Sheehan noted that in the wake of the Mineral, Va. tremblor, “walk down” or visual inspections “of key infrastructure at each facility” at all nuclear plants were conducted both by plant personnel and independently by the resident NRC inspectors at each plant.

“No structural damage has been identified at any of the affected plants,” he wrote.

But while visual inspections may have found no damage, any underground damage not evident to the naked eye could only be identified by a change in readings for pipes, gauges or underground valves, according to Sheehan.

“Any significant impacts on buried piping would be readily noticeable via changes in flows. Also, plant owners are required to perform flow tests on safety- and non-safety-related piping at regular intervals,” Sheehan wrote in his email.

“Whether those checks would need to be accelerated in light of yesterday’s earthquake will have to be determined,” he added.

Perhaps that determination will be influenced by the AP report which found underground leaks “sometimes go undiscovered for years, the AP found.”

The AP found that leaks of water laced with traces of tritium, a radioactive form of hydrogen, have been found at 48 of 65 nuclear sites “repeatedly at many of them.”

Although some of those leaks occurred at plants owned by Exelon, no such leak has ever been reported at the Limerick Generating Station.

However, “slightly elevated levels of tritium” were found in six water samples taken from on-site wells at Limerick as well as in one surface water sample according to a study released in 2006. However, the company statement issued at the time said those higher levels are the result of “historic releases.”

In other words: surface spills, not underground leaks.

The “historic releases” were described by a company spokesperson as four “unplanned liquid releases” of tritium that took place “over the past 20 years.”

The tritium was the result of spills, not underground leaks, that had all occurred “in isolated areas on the plant property where you don’t normally find tritium” and had all been reported to the NRC and to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.

All the spills were “within our permitted discharge levels” and there were no fines or violations associated with them and the spokesperson said the tests showed none of Limerick’s underground systems were leaking in 2006.

But there were leaks at three Illinois nuclear plants owned by Exelon, one of them from an underground source that went on for four years.

The AP reported that “nuclear operators have failed to stop an epidemic of leaks in pipes and other underground equipment in damp settings. The country’s nuclear sites have suffered more than 400 accidental radioactive leaks during their history, the activist Union of Concerned Scientists reported in September.

“Plant operators have been drilling monitoring wells and patching hidden or buried piping and other equipment for several years to control an escalating outbreak.

“Here, too, they have failed. Between 2000 and 2009, the annual number of leaks from underground piping shot up fivefold, according to an internal industry document obtained and analyzed by the AP.”

The AP investigation also reported “many of the pipes or tanks have been patched, and contaminated soil and water have been removed in some places. But leaks are often discovered later from other nearby piping, tanks or vaults. Mistakes and defective material have contributed to some leaks. However, corrosion — from decades of use and deterioration — is the main cause. And, safety engineers say, the rash of leaks suggest nuclear operators are hard put to maintain the decades-old systems.”

All of which occurred, presumably, without the added stress of an earthquake on aging materials exposed to corrosion.

In addition to publishing an assessment of NRC investigation and enforcement following incidents at plants in 2010, The Union of Concerned Scientists recently issued a set of recommendations for ways NRC could improve safety at the nations 104 nuclear reactors.

Among those recommendations:

• “The NRC should require plant owners to use multiple inspection techniques to ensure detection of any degradation in aging, high-risk equipment.

• “The NRC should require plant owners to periodically inspect equipment outside the scope of normal inspections, both to determine whether that scope is appropriate and to detect problems before safety margins are compromised.”

SOURCE: http://timesherald.com/articles/2011/08/24/news/doc4e55b13c42b0c638332971.txt?viewmode=fullstory

MATCOR Hires Robert Johnson as Technical Project Manager

Robert Johnson MATCOR
MATCOR Hires Robert Johnson as Technical Project Manager

Doylestown, PA (August 5) – MATCOR, Inc. a full-service provider of proprietary cathodic protection products, systems, and corrosion engineering solutions today announced Robert Johnson has joined MATCOR as Technical Project Manager, bringing a wealth of experience in managing large oil and gas pipeline construction projects.

Johnson brings more than 13 years of experience in the energy sector, and will report to Director of Engineering, Chris Sheldon

“Robert is a great addition to the expanding MATCOR client services team,” said Sheldon. “He has extensive engineering, estimating and construction experience in the energy sector, working directly for leading energy companies such as Reliant Energy, CenterPoint Energy and Equitable Resources to name a few, where he was responsible for ensuring quality, cost, schedule and safety goals were achieved.”

Johnson said, “I was attracted to MATCOR because they have consistently demonstrated leadership in the cathodic protection industry.  The diverse product line, engineering and project management services bring MATCOR to the forefront in this ever-diversifying market.  MATCOR is ready to meet the unique challenges and provide the vital services required.”

Johnson will be based out of MATCOR’s Houston Gulf Coast facility.

ABOUT MATCOR
MATCOR, Inc. is a leading cathodic protection and corrosion prevention engineering design firm, providing environmentally beneficial systems and services to global clients for nearly 40 years. An expert in the field of cathodic protection, MATCOR offers proprietary corrosion protection design, products, installation, cathodic protection testing, maintenance and complete corrosion protection project management. MATCOR specializes in protecting the infrastructure of the oil and gas, electric utility, transportation and construction industries. 
To learn more about MATCOR, visit the new website at matcor.com or call 800 523 6692.

Pipeline with Coating Degradation benefit from Deep Well Anode Solution

MATCOR Mini-Deep Anode
The MATCOR Mini-Deep Anode will protect the system for 20 years or more

An International Petrochemical Company contracted with MATCOR to review assessment data gathered more than 10 years earlier.  MATCOR’s initial findings showed the existing Cathodic Protection System was struggling to maintain criteria.  To determine the exact cause of the problems MATCOR launched a comprehensive survey of 20 miles of 26 inch pipeline.

From the initial review of the pipeline, it became clear that the existing Cathodic Protection system did not have the capacity to distribute DC current effectively. MATCOR’s technicians performed Close Interval Surveys (CIS), Pipeline Current Mapping (PCM), and Direct Current Voltage Gradient (DCVG) surveys.  In addition, MATCOR took soil samples and had them analyzed, measuring pH, sulfates and sulfides, chlorides and moisture content.  The results corresponded with the smart pig runs, which further validated the testing and data analysis.  The survey revealed significant coating degradation.

It was clear from the current requirement test results that a new Cathodic Protection System was necessary.  The client’s choice was MATCOR’s patented Mini-Deep Anode System, which is very easily installed without disruption to the pipeline.

In all, 15 Mini-Deep Anodes were used to protect 40-plus miles of pipeline and connecting laterals.

MATCOR strategically placed ground beds approximately one mile east and west of the rectifiers.  On a new pipeline, each MATCOR Mini-Deep Anode can protect many miles of line, but since these pipelines experienced coating degradation, MATCOR designed the system to protect the existing lines from low structure to electrolyte potentials.

Upon completion of the testing and commissioning of the rectifier and ground bed system, this pipeline system, with associated laterals, was able to achieve -850mV OFF potential throughout its entire length.

The client was concerned that the 100mV criterion would have to be used in certain areas due to poor coating conditions; however, this was not the case.  MATCOR achieved complete integrity by incorporating the correct combination of engineering, design, and cooperation from the client.

The Mini-Deep Anodes will protect the system for 20 years or more.

MATCOR Announces Next Generation Connection Technology for its Mixed Metal Oxide Products

Kynex Connection From MATCOR
MATCOR, Inc. a full-service provider of proprietary and proven cathodic protection systems and solutions, today announced the introduction of a new connection technology known as “Kynex™

Doylestown, PA (July 5) – MATCOR, Inc. a full-service provider of proprietary and proven cathodic protection systems and solutions, today announced the introduction of a new connection technology known as “Kynex™”, and MATCOR will begin manufacturing its signature Linear Anodes and Deep Well Anode Systems with this next generation patent-pending connection technology.

Cathodic protection experts agree the connection of any linear anode product is the weakest link in an anode system’s integrity. In some instances, cable connection failures result in rapid and catastrophic failure of the anode before it has reached the end of its useful life, many times resulting in assets that are not being protected against corrosion.

While the existing MATCOR connections are engineered to last and have an outstanding performance history, MATCOR responded to the needs of the corrosion and cathodic protection industry to eliminate the weakest link issue altogether. As a result and after years of development, MATCOR introduces Kynex™, a significant improvement to the existing manual anode to cable connection market.

The new Kynex™ technology utilizes computer-controlled manufacturing equipment that provides consistent, quality, and reliability that simply cannot be achieved by any manual method.

“Kynex™ is another example of MATCOR’s drive to lead the cathodic protection industry with 21st century tools – we’ve taken the steps to make the world’s best cathodic protection products even better,” said Jeff Stello, MATCOR’s President & CEO.

Over the years, MATCOR has become known for introducing groundbreaking cathodic protection products.  Kynex™ continues this trend.

William Schutt, MATCOR’s Chairman explains, “We have continued what we do best, innovate and develop technical excellence for the corrosion industry to benefit the clients we serve.”

Kynex™ utilizes advanced injection molding technology to mold Kynar™ around the anode to cable connection.  The process is carefully calibrated and monitored during the manufacturing process to ensure a consistent, repeatable connection.  The result is a robust connection that is more reliable than today’s manually-made connections. “With Kynex, we are replacing manual assembly with sophisticated automated assembly.   We are moving from the buggy whip era to the aerospace era,” said Ted Huck, MATCOR’s Vice President of International Sales & Marketing.

The Kynex™ technology is the first connection of its kind, and is expected to be widely adopted as the new standard for connection technology.

For more information about Kynex™  visit: https://www.matcor.com/kynex