Category Archives: NACE

Jeffrey L. Didas Elected NACE International President

Chalfont, PA (April 2018) – MATCOR, Inc., the trusted full-service provider of proprietary cathodic protection products, systems, services and corrosion engineering solutions announces that senior engineer and pipeline practice lead Jeffrey L. Didas has been elected to the position of president for NACE International (NACE), the Worldwide Corrosion Authority. His term as president is one year commencing at the close of the NACE Corrosion Conference & Expo 2018, taking place April 15-19 in Phoenix, Arizona.

Jeffrey Didas, Practice Lead - Pipelines, MATCOR, Inc.
Jeffrey L. Didas will serve a one-year term as NACE president commencing at the close of the NACE Corrosion Conference & Expo 2018

As NACE president, Didas will advise, govern, oversee policy and direction, and assist with the leadership and promotion of NACE International to support the organization’s mission. He will also serve as chairman of the executive committee and an officer of the association. His responsibilities will include presiding at all official functions of the board of directors and executive committee, including the annual membership meeting of the association and the annual NACE banquet. This position is part of Didas’ five-year commitment to NACE following previous roles as vice president elect and vice president. Following his term as president he will serve one year as past president and one year on the nominating committee.

“I look forward to serving NACE as president over the next year,” said Didas. “My focus will be on member engagement, retention and benefits, moving forward with the strategic plan and our vision for NACE 2030, and promoting the groundbreaking corrosion industry IMPACT Study.”

Didas, an industry expert sought worldwide and active NACE member since 1975, has 44 years of diverse corrosion experience working for pipeline and energy company owner-operators and most recently for MATCOR.

Prior to his executive leadership roles, Didas held a variety of national NACE positions including:

  • Treasurer of NACE International, the NACE Foundation and the NACE Institute
  • Director of the Member Activities Committee – MAC
  • Committee chair for several technical exchange groups (TEGs), including the Corrosion Control Coordinating Committee (TEG 022X), Pipeline Crossings: Steel-Cased, Thrust-Bored, and HDD TEG 208X) and Steel-Cased Pipelines (TG 012)
  • Technology coordinator for technology management group TMG C1 – Corrosion Prevention and Control for Concrete, Land Transportation and Coating Technology
  • Vice chair of the NACE Institute Policy & Practices Committee
  • Member of the Technical Practices Committee – TPC/Technical Coordination Committee – TCC since 1978

He has also served as chair, vice-chair, and general member of several administrative committees over the past 44 years.

Didas received the NACE Brannon Award in 2014 and the NACE Distinguished Service Award in 2001 for his many contributions to the organization. He also received the Appalachian Underground Corrosion Short Course (AUCSC) Colonel Cox award in 2010.

Didas holds the highest level of NACE certification as a Corrosion Specialist and a number of other NACE certifications, including Cathodic Protection Specialist, Coatings Specialist, Chemical Treatment Specialist, Senior Corrosion Technologist, Corrosion Technologist, Corrosion Technician and Level 3 Certified Corrosion Inspector. In addition he is a SSPC (Society for Protective Coatings) certified Protective Coatings Specialist.

Didas graduated from Thomas A. Edison State University in Trenton, NJ, with a BSET in Electrical Engineering. He acquired his ASEE in Electronics Technology from Springfield Technical Community College in Springfield MA.

About NACE

NACE International, The Worldwide Corrosion Authority, serves nearly 36,000+ members in 130 countries and is recognized globally as the premier authority for corrosion control solutions. The organization offers technical training and certification programs, conferences, industry standards, reports, publications, technical journals, government relations activities and more. NACE International is headquartered in Houston, Texas, with offices in San Diego, California; Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Shanghai, China, Sao Paulo, Brazil and Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia.

Visit nace.org for more information.

About MATCOR

Remediation Options for Aging Pipeline Coating Systems

A linear anode system may be an economical alternative to applying a new pipeline coating system or replacing aging pipelines.

by Ted Huck

Introduction: Addressing Aging Pipelines and Pipeline Coatings

aging pipeline coatingExternal corrosion is one of the significant threats facing pipeline operators worldwide. Historically, pipeline owners have employed a two-tiered approach towards mitigating corrosion risks. The primary defense against corrosion has been to apply a pipeline coating system that acts as a barrier, protecting the steel pipe from its environment. Cathodic protection is employed to supplement the coating system by providing protective current to the holidays or defects within the coating system. As with any aging structure, however, time takes its toll – for older pipelines this often results in an older coating system that starts to degrade in its primary function of protecting the pipeline from its environment.

This paper addresses the fundamental issue that many operators will face when evaluating their aging pipelines and pipeline coating systems. That issue is, quite simply, what is the best strategy to remediate an aging pipeline with deteriorating coating systems to maintain compliance with international standards for pipeline integrity. The options are to improve/upgrade the cathodic protection system, recoat the pipeline, or replace the pipeline. Each of these options will be discussed in detail and a decision matrix will be provided to facilitate the operator’s decision-making process.

Pipeline Coating Systems

Coating systems have been used on buried pipelines during the last hundred years and the technology continues to be the subject of significant research and innovation. Pipeline coating manufacturers are continually searching for better coatings to meet the varied needs of industry. Initially, the coatings were simple mixtures of crude pitches and solvents. These early bitumastic/asphaltic systems evolved into engineered coal tar enamel coating systems, which were prevalent into the 1960’s. The introduction of fusion-bonded epoxies (FBE) in the 1970’s quickly captured much of the pipeline market, although polyethylene, polypropylene and coal tar enamels are still used as well. The coatings industry continues to research and develop improved methods of providing more reliable and more economical coating systems.

When evaluating aging pipelines, coating condition is one of the critical issues that must be addressed. The coating provides the primary defense against corrosion and as the coating system ages and deteriorates, then the risks of corrosion increase exponentially. One of the challenges that must be addressed by pipeline owners is properly identifying the type and vintage of the coatings along a given pipeline. In many cases, different sections of pipeline may have different coating systems depending on the age of the pipeline and the standards in place at the time a section of pipe was installed.

Another critical consideration when evaluating aging pipeline coating systems is to identify whether the coating system fails shielding or non-shielding. Coating systems that fail in a non-shielding mode do not inhibit the flow of current making cathodic protection a viable alternative when considering how to remediate these lines. Other coating systems, principally tape coating systems, can fail in a manner that shields cathodic protection current and thus greatly reducing the possible remediation methods available.

Modern, over-the-line survey technologies have proven to be quite effective in evaluating coating quality and finding coating holidays. Technologies such as pipeline current mapping (PCM) which utilize a carrier signal transmitted along the pipeline with a receiver measuring the line attenuation along the pipeline length can accurately pinpoint areas of significant coating degradation even under concrete or asphalt. The information gathered using PCM in conjunction with pipe to soil close interval surveys (CIS) and direct current voltage gradient (DCVG) testing form the basis for identifying critical risk areas along aging pipelines. In-line inspection technologies using smart pigs also provide valuable data regarding coating quality.

Cathodic Protection

Pipeline coating systems are typically augmented by the application of cathodic protection. With a well-coated pipeline, cathodic protection can be economically applied to protect the coating holidays and defects by placing discreet anode beds that distribute current over long distances. In many cases ground beds can be located several kilometers apart and still provide sufficient current distribution to protect the entire pipeline. With some of today’s high technology factory applied coatings, the coating efficiencies are exceptionally high and the groundbed output requirements are very low. These discreet ground bed systems can either be deep anode ground beds or shallow ground beds located some distance off the pipeline.

Several issues must be considered when designing a cathodic protection system. These include coating quality, soil resistivity, available locations for electrical power, ground bed right of way issues, accessibility for maintenance, AC and DC stray current interference, and a host of additional issues. What is critical for aging pipelines is the regular evaluation of the effectiveness of the CP system. Frequently, as pipelines age and the coating quality begins to deteriorate, the CP systems are unable to provide sufficient current properly distributed to meet established cathodic protection criteria. In many cases, simply ramping up the output of the existing system or adding additional ground beds does not prove sufficient to address the problem.

Aging Pipeline Systems

Problem Identification

Aging pipeline systems with deteriorating coating systems suffer from poor current distribution and are characterized by areas of low potentials and exceedingly high levels of applied current density. The challenge with these pipeline systems is controlling current distribution to achieve the prescribed polarization levels consistent with international standards for adequate cathodic protection.

Figure 1 shows a deep well anode system with current output such that some areas are not meeting required off-potentials of -0.85 Volts to meet NACE criteria.

pipeline coating - insufficient cathodic protection

Initial Responses

The typical response to this problem is to increase the overall output of the deep well system (see Figure 2.) This generally does not alleviate the problems of not meeting the off-potential criteria and leads to over-polarizing the piping (potentials greater than -1.2 Volts.) This can result in coating disbondment further exacerbating the problem. The higher output current increases the ground bed’s consumption rate reducing operating life while raising operating costs appreciably. All this occurs without achieving the required levels of polarization to meet cathodic protection criteria.

pipeline coating - increased cathodic protection output

The next step that is taken to fix the cathodic protection current distribution problem is to add additional ground beds to reduce the distance between point sources. This too, proves to be an ineffective solution as the new ground bed provides only limited additional benefit (see Figure 3.)

pipeline coating - additional cathodic protection ground beds

Remediation Options

The problem cannot be economically resolved by the addition of an ever-increasing number of ground beds applying greater and greater amounts of additional current. The pipeline operator is then faced with a limited number of options: recoat the pipeline, replace the pipeline, or install a linear anode cathodic protection system.

Recoating/replacing is the only viable alternative for pipeline systems utilizing shielding type coatings such as tape wrap systems. Recoating costs typically run several hundred dollars per foot in open right of way areas and can be significantly more expensive in congested urban locations (these are ballpark numbers applicable to the United States and can vary significantly.) Recoating, when properly performed, can restore the pipeline coating system to an as new condition greatly extending the service life of the recoated section. The critical issue is to assure that the recoating is executed by an experienced coatings contractor with rigorous quality controls in place. Pipeline replacement is expensive and only performed when extensive third-party damage, significant corrosion or other extenuating circumstances warrant.

An economically attractive alternative to recoat/replace options is to utilize a linear anode configuration in lieu of point anode systems. This option is only viable when the coating system is non-shielding – this would include asphaltic and epoxy type coating systems. The application of a linear anode system typically costs between $20-30/foot in open right of way (again these are general price guidelines and can vary significantly.) In suburban or urban areas, horizontal directional drilling (HDD) can be an effective installation method with minimal surface disruptions. These linear anode systems eliminate the distribution problems experienced by point anode systems; they are in effect an infinite series of point anodes, which provide an optimum current distribution (see Figure 4.)

pipeline coating - linear anode system for optimum current distribution

In addition to confirming that the pipeline coating system is non-shielding and appropriate for the application of linear anodes, the linear anode system design must take into consideration the critical issue of voltage drop and its affect on current attenuation. Voltage drop can have a significant impact on DC power distribution to the linear anode system. Ideally, rectifiers would be located no further than half a mile to a mile apart, however, practical considerations including availability of AC power, right of way issues and other factors can force this to be extended further complicating the system design and affecting the installed cost.

While the design can be complicated by voltage drop considerations, one of the benefits of a linear anode system is that the power consumption is relatively low. Ground bed resistance, as determined by Dwight’s Equation, is significantly affected by anode length and this results in very low groundbed resistance values for linear anode systems relative to conventional ground beds. This makes the linear anode system much more suitable for low wattage power sources such as solar arrays and thermo-electric generators (TEG’s) than conventional ground beds whose wattage could be two or more times that of a linear anode system to achieve the same current discharge.

Conclusion

Aging pipeline systems with deteriorating coating systems present a difficult challenge to pipeline operators. The more the coating deteriorates, the more difficult it is to distribute current further away from the ground bed. The natural response to ramp up the ground bed output does an inadequate job of throwing current further but does result in increased current flow, higher current densities and over polarization near the ground bed further stressing the coating system. Adding additional ground beds also allows more current to be applied to the pipeline, but does not alleviate the current distribution issues. Ultimately, pipeline operators are faced with the choice of recoating/replacing the pipeline, or installing a linear anode system. The flowchart below (Figure 5) provides a decision matrix. Note that aging pipeline systems whose coating systems are determined to be in good condition through indirect and direct examination, require additional investigation to determine why criteria is not being achieved.

Aging pipeline coating decision matrix


For assistance with evaluating aging pipelines or installing linear anode cathodic protection systems, please CONTACT US.

April 24 is Corrosion Awareness Day

Did you know that corrosion costs us an astounding 2.5 trillion dollars globally?

Not to mention corrosion can cost lives and jobs…

Today is corrosion awareness day, so we thought it would be a good idea to reiterate the importance of the NACE IMPACT (International Measures of Prevention, Application, and Economics of Corrosion Technologies) study released in 2016.

According to the study, most corrosion failures, and nearly all catastrophic corrosion failures are preventable. And nearly $875 billion can be saved through the right prevention and risk analysis efforts.

Through the IMPACT study, NACE determined that in order to reduce the astronomical cost of corrosion, we would have to change how decisions are made regarding corrosion. We must not only continue to develop corrosion control methods and technology, but we must utilize organizational management systems and risk tools throughout all levels of an organization to achieve the greatest success in saving lives, jobs and money.

You can learn more by visiting impact.nace.org.

Jeffrey L. Didas to Speak on Pipeline Casing Integrity Management

Cathodic protection expert to present at Corrosion 2017

Jeffrey Didas, Practice Lead - Pipelines, MATCOR, Inc.MATCOR senior corrosion engineer Jeffrey L. Didas will present “Management of Pipeline Casing Issues” at Corrosion 2017, taking place March 26-30, 2017 in New Orleans, LA.

Presentation Details

Corrosion 2017
TEG 208X Symposium – Pipeline Crossings: Steel-Cased, Thrust-Bored, and HDD
Thursday, March 30, 2017, 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center-New Orleans – Room 227

Pipeline casings are an issue whether clear or shorted. This presentation will cover the various issues with casings and what, if anything, can be done to remediate these issues. Mr. Didas’ discussion will include pipeline casing cathodic protection (CP), casing filling, casing removal and more.

Mr. Didas is senior corrosion engineer for MATCOR and an industry expert with over 42 years of diverse corrosion experience and the highest level of NACE certification. He also currently serves in the elected position of vice president elect for the NACE Board of Directors and has held a variety of national positions.

About MATCOR

MATCOR’s Jeffrey L. Didas Elected NACE International VP Elect

Jeffrey Didas, Practice Lead - Pipelines, MATCOR, Inc.MATCOR senior engineer and pipeline practice lead Jeffrey L. Didas has been elected to the position of vice president elect for NACE International (NACE), the Worldwide Corrosion Authority.

As vice president elect for NACE, in addition to his responsibilities as an incoming board member, Didas will serve as ex-officio member of the NACE finance and policy committees and the NACE Foundation board of directors. This position is a five-year commitment where Didas will serve one year each as vice president elect, vice president, president and past president followed by one year on the nominating committee.

“I look forward to serving NACE in an expanded capacity over the next five years,” said Didas. “My focus will be on member engagement, retention and benefits, moving forward with the strategic plan and our vision for NACE 2030, and promoting the groundbreaking corrosion industry IMPACT Study.”

Didas, an industry expert sought worldwide and active NACE member since 1975, has 42 years of diverse corrosion experience working for pipeline and energy company owner-operators and most recently for MATCOR.

Prior to his newly elected position as NACE vice president elect, Didas held a variety of national NACE positions including treasurer of NACE International, the NACE Foundation and the NACE Institute, and committee chair for several technical exchange groups (TEGs), including the Corrosion Control Coordinating Committee (TEG 022X), Pipeline Crossings: Steel-Cased, Thrust-Bored, and HDD TEG 208X) and Steel-Cased Pipelines (TG 012). He also presently serves NACE as technology coordinator for technology management group TMG C1 – Corrosion Prevention and Control for Concrete, Land Transportation and Coating Technology and vice chair of the NACE Institute Policy & Practices Committee.

Didas received the NACE Brannon Award in 2014 and the NACE Distinguished Service Award in 2001 for his many contributions to the organization. He also received the Appalachian Underground Corrosion Short Course (AUCSC) Colonel Cox award in 2010.

Didas holds the highest level of NACE certification as a Corrosion Specialist, and a number of other NACE certifications including Cathodic Protection Specialist, Coatings Specialist, Chemical Treatment Specialist, Senior Corrosion Technologist, Corrosion Technologist, Corrosion Technician and Level 3 Certified Corrosion Inspector. In addition he is a SSPC (Society for Protective Coatings) certified Protective Coatings Specialist.

Didas graduated from Thomas A. Edison State University in Trenton, NJ, with a BSET in Electrical Engineering. He acquired his ASEE in Electronics Technology from Springfield Technical Community College, Springfield MA.

About NACE

NACE International, The Worldwide Corrosion Authority, serves nearly 36,000+ members in 130 countries and is recognized globally as the premier authority for corrosion control solutions. The organization offers technical training and certification programs, conferences, industry standards, reports, publications, technical journals, government relations activities and more. NACE International is headquartered in Houston, Texas, with offices in San Diego, California; Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Shanghai, China, Sao Paulo, Brazil and Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia.

Visit www.nace.org for more information.

About MATCOR

Linear Anode Cathodic Protection Presentation at NACE UAE

MATCOR to Present on Impressed Current Linear Anode Cathodic Protection at NACE UAE Corrosion Conference in Abu Dhabi

Chalfont, PA (April 27, 2015) – MATCOR, Inc. the trusted full-service provider of proprietary cathodic protection products, systems, and corrShailesh Javia, MATCOR, Inc. to present on linear anode cathodic protection at NACE UAE.osion engineering solutions will present a paper exploring the use of flexible impressed current linear anodes to minimize current densities for a wide range of cathodic protection applications at the annual NACE UAE Corrosion Conference held at the St. Regis in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates May 12-14, 2015.

Flexible Impressed Current Linear Anode Cathodic Protection
Shailesh Javia, MATCOR
Wednesday, May 13, 2015, 3:35-4:00 p.m. in Al Mudhaif 1

The presentation explores flexible impressed current linear anode cathodic protection that extends the benefits of linear anodes for various CP applications. To minimize current distribution challenges, the linear anodes are designed utilizing multiple internal connections, which provides redundancy and protection against uneven anode consumption, minimizes current densities and allows placement in close proximity to the structure. The linear anode is simple to install, requiring only a small trench, and is ideal for congested areas and tight spaces. See below for the complete abstract.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Shailesh Javia serves as International Director for MATCOR and has over 22 years experience focused on corrosion engineering and cathodic protection. His diverse knowledge and experience includes designing cathodic protection systems, managing turnkey CP projects and conducting commissioning surveys for cross country and city gas pipelines, tanks and vessels, tank bottoms, and industrial facilities including fertilizer, petrochemical and power plants, and refineries. Mr. Javia is a certified NACE Cathodic Protection Technologist, has successfully completed the NACE Direct Assessment Course and has presented several papers at NACE and ASME conferences.

ABSTRACT: Applications of Impressed Current Linear Anodes in Cathodic Protection

Flexible impressed current linear anodes can extend the benefits
 of linear anodes to a wide range 
of cathodic protection applications. Tight spaces, high traffic areas, poorly coated pipelines, new construction tank bottom, tank bottom retrofits, reinforcing steel-in-concrete, sheet pile walls or inside large diameter pipes – are all good examples of linear anode cathodic protection applications.

Linear anodes handle current distribution challenges by minimizing current densities, in addition to placement in close proximity to the structure being protected from corrosion. Innovative design utilizing 
multiple internal connections provides redundancy, protects against uneven
 anode consumption and minimizes
 voltage drop.

Linear anodes can simply 
be laid alongside a new pipeline; cable
 plowed next to an existing pipeline, or 
installed utilizing horizontal directional 
drilling (HDD) under an existing
 structure. Linear anodes require only a small trench for installation, ideal for congested areas and minimizing landowner “right of way” issues.

ABOUT MATCOR

Legislation Vital for Corrosion Protection of Public Infrastructure

On June 3, the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014 (WWRDA) was presented to President Obama after passing with bi-partisan support through both houses of Congress. Typically, the WWRDA is reauthorized every few years, but this marks the first time the legislation has been passed since 2007. This important legislation will fund infrastructure improvements to public water resources, including the implementation of corrosion protection to water pipes.

The WWRDA will also dramatically increase investment in U.S. public water infrastructure. In states like New Jersey, where the average age of underground water pipes is more than 70 years, this bill will go a long way to prevent the degradation and corrosion of invaluable national assets. The reauthorization will also lead to thousands of stable jobs, helping the long-term health of state economies across the nation.

NACE International, the world’s foremost professional organization in the corrosion control industry, lauded the bill for providing instrumental support and recommendations for the Army Corps of Engineers to advance key corrosion control measures in national infrastructures.

“This legislation provides businesses, Federal agencies, and the American public with clarity that there will be improvements to our waterway infrastructure for the foreseeable future,” said Bob Chalker, Chief Executive Officer of NACE International. “This is an important step forward.”

Cathodic Protection by Corrosion Engineering Experts

As water resources and infrastructure age, they fall at risk to the effects of corrosion. MATCOR, a Pennsylvania-based company specializing in cathodic protection products and corrosion engineering services, said it appreciated the steps taken by Congress to ensure the safety and viability of public pipelines.

“The passage of the Water Resources Reform and Development Act is a great step for public infrastructure in the US,” said Jeff Didas, pipelines practice lead for MATCOR. “In order to maintain the integrity of the public infrastructure in the United States, we must stay vigilant to prevent the constant threat of corrosion and wear.”

“NACE International is a global leader in corrosion prevention and we stand with them in congratulating Congress for passing this monumental piece of bipartisan legislation,” Didas said.

MATCOR provides a full range of corrosion protection services. Our staff of NACE certified specialists are experts in corrosion engineering and cathodic protection products. MATCOR leads the industry in cathodic protection services for detection, diagnosis and prevention of corrosion in pipelines.

Corrosion engineering can provide solutions to handle a full range of corrosion problems and unique situations. MATCOR has a suite of proprietary cathodic protection products and systems. Cathodic protection is a technique used to control the corrosion of a metal surface through the application of electric current.

NACE International Applauds House and Senate Passage of Bipartisan Water Infrastructure Legislation,” press release, May 22, 2014.

MATCOR Supports NACE Foundation Workforce Development Program on Worldwide Corrosion Awareness Day

Chalfont, PA – April 24, 2014, MATCOR, Inc., the trusted full-service provider of proprietary cathodic protection products, systems and corrosion engineering solutions, recently hired Isaac Renfro, a graduate of the NACE Foundation Workforce Development Program. The company also supports the program year-round through staff involvement and financial support.

Isaac Renfro, NACE Workforce Development Program graduate and MATCOR Technician
Isaac, who served previously in the US Coast Guard, completed the NACE Workforce Development Program in late 2013 and joined MATCOR in March 2014 as a technician working out of the company’s gulf coast office in Houston, Texas. In this position Isaac performs installation and testing of MATCOR’s proprietary cathodic protection products and systems. The NACE program prepared Isaac for the position with MATCOR by providing NACE Basic Corrosion and NACE Cathodic Protection Level 1 certifications
The NACE Foundation Workforce Development Program addresses the growing workforce needs in the corrosion field. In the first phase of this program, NACE provides job training, including scholarships for corrosion courses and placement assistance to military veterans. Each candidate is also matched with a mentor from the industry who provides advice on networking, training and career opportunities within the corrosion industry and assists in securing an internship or permanent position

In addition to hiring a recent program graduate, MATCOR supports the NACE Foundation on an ongoing basis by encouraging staff volunteerism. Jeff Didas, Practice Lead-Pipelines for MATCOR, serves on the NACE Foundation Board of Directors and as a mentor. Nickalaus Judd, Director – Field Operations for MATCOR, also serves as a mentor. And, in in honor of World Corrosion Awareness Day on April 24, MATCOR recently made a donation to financially support the ongoing efforts of the Workforce Development Program.

“I met recently with a new mentee from the NACE program, and I encouraged him to seriously consider the corrosion industry, where the ability to grow is only hindered by one’s desire to do so,” said Judd. “I look forward to connecting with him regularly so he can see what MATCOR does firsthand and grow into our industry.”
The World Corrosion Organization designated April 24 “Worldwide Corrosion Awareness Day” in 2010 to promote education and best practices in corrosion control for the socio-economic benefit of society, preservation of resources, and protection of the environment.

“Workforce development is one of the greatest challenges facing the corrosion industry, and the NACE program is taking important steps to ensure that candidates are aware of opportunities and qualified for available positions,” said Douglas Fastuca, President of MATCOR. “We are very pleased to support this important work of the NACE Foundation and the high-quality pool of military veterans. We are honored to highlight these efforts as part of Worldwide Corrosion Awareness Day this week.”

ABOUT MATCOR

MATCOR is a full-service, ISO 9001:2008 certified provider of customized cathodic protection systems to the oil & gas, power, water and other infrastructures industries. Cathodic Protection is a technique used to control the corrosion of a metal surface through the application of electric current. MATCOR has an array of proprietary cathodic protection products and systems combined with high-quality corrosion engineering, installation and maintenance services.

In business for 40 years, MATCOR is considered the technology leader in the cathodic protection and corrosion engineering fields. MATCOR is headquartered in Chalfont, PA, has a service office in Houston, TX and recently established a presence in Ahmedabad, India. The company provides turnkey services throughout the United States and has a growing list of international distributors. MATCOR has been named to the Inc. 5,000 list of fastest growing companies in 2011, 2012 and 2013.

Following our success in 2013, MATCOR is expanding by hiring new talent for cathodic protection, corrosion engineering jobs.

MATCOR is a full service provider of customized cathodic protection systems to the oil & MATCOR_Vertical_webgas, power, water/wastewater and other infrastructures industries.  Cathodic Protection is a technique used to control the corrosion of a metal surface by making it the cathode of an electrochemical cell.  MATCOR has an array of proprietary cathodic protection products and systems combined with high-quality corrosion engineering services, and installation and maintenance services.

In business for over 40 years, MATCOR is considered the technology leader in cathodic protection and corrosion engineering.  MATCOR is headquartered in Chalfont, PA, has a major service operation in Houston, TX, provides turnkey services throughout the United States, and has a growing list of international distributors.  MATCOR has been named to the Inc. 5,000 list of fastest growing companies in 2011, 2012 and 2013. Because of strong continued growth, MATCOR is seeking talented new team members to fill cathodic protection and corrosion engineering jobs.

MATCOR employees and culture are driven by three core principles. Whether a technician, engineer or manager, these principles guide us toward positive relationships with our clients and positive outcomes to every project we undertake.  These core values are:  We Respect Others, We Honor our Commitments and We Act in a Safe and Responsible Way.

“Our cathodic protection and corrosion engineering job openings, from technician to management positions, offer you the opportunity to grow with our team of seasoned cathodic protection experts and become part of a unique culture,” said Doug Fastuca, president of MATCOR, “As we are experiencing tremendous growth and request for our products and service offerings, this is an excellent time to join MATCOR.  In addition to competitive benefits, you can become NACE certified and enjoy other advanced educational opportunities.”

Our ideal job candidates will possess these values and hold a positive attitude.  This is a rapidly growing company with many new career opportunities.  Your cathodic protection, corrosion engineering and management job opportunity is here, today!

View the open position here: http://matcor.applicantpro.com/jobs/

New Global Cathodic Protection & Corrosion Costs Study Announced By Corrosion Society

NACE International has begun an expansive global study that will examine the cathodic protection and corrosion costs across a variety of industries. The effort will provide research on controlling corrosion-related costs, which will help improve corrosion and cathodic protection strategies. 

NACE International, an international corrosion and corrosion engineering society based in Houston, Texas, has announced the launch of a two-year global cathodic protection and corrosion costs study that will examine the financial and societal effects of corrosion on a variety of industries and provide data about methods for controlling costs related to corrosion.

Industries covered by the corrosion costs study include manufacturing, infrastructure, transportation, utilities and government. The study will integrate research from partners in international and regional industry and academia and will be managed by Elaine Bowman, a longtime corrosion industry advocate and former president of NACE International.

“Corrosion is an inevitable, but controllable process which can result in destructive, even catastrophic incidents when not properly prevented and managed,” Bowman said in a press release. “Costs associated with corrosion control include direct expenses like repair and replacement of assets. But there are additional indirect costs like production lost due to closure for repairs or the environmental and physical impact of corrosion-related failures.”

The cathodic protection and corrosion costs study will help asset owners identity ways to save up to 30 percent on costs related to controlling corrosion, Bowman said.

“The NACE corrosion costs study will likely provide invaluable data for us and our customers going forward,” said Ted Huck, who works as the practice lead for plants and facilities with MATCOR, a cathodic protection company that specializes in providing customized corrosion engineering and cathodic protection systems.

“Essential information and comprehensive scientific modeling about corrosion will only improve our understanding of the impact of corrosion on the oil and gas and other industries we serve,” Huck said. “And that means even better corrosion and cathodic protection strategies and tactics for our customers.”

An earlier corrosion costs study in 2001 estimated that the annual direct costs of corrosion in the U.S. was $276 billion. The study, funded by the U.S. Congress with Federal Highway Administration oversight and NACE International support, resulted in the development of a Corrosion Policy and Oversight (CPO) office within the Department of Defense.

“Quantifying the costs of corrosion is an important effort in educating asset owners to the value of investing in asset life extension technologies such as cathodic protection to provide the lowest total cost of ownership,” said Huck. “Corrosion is a hidden, and often avoidable, cost to asset owners and something that can be mitigated with the appropriate use of current, available technologies.”

The CPO demonstrated a return as high as 40-to-1 on investments for corrosion control programs implemented by the Department of Defense. The 2001 study also resulted in congressional support for the world’s first undergraduate degree in corrosion engineering.

Further Reading

NACE International Commences Global Study on Corrosion Costs and Preventative Strategies,” Press Release, Nov. 14, 2013.