Category Archives: Cathodic Protection

Canister Anodes: HSCI vs MMO

Canister anodes are commonly used for impressed current anode cathodic protection applications. These can be used to protect buried metallic piping in congested plant environments, to protect distribution or transmission pipelines in either distributed shallow ground beds or as horizontal remote ground bed anodes, and to protect other structures such as above ground or buried tanks and piling systems.

mmo-canister-anode-emailMATCOR’s MMP™ Anode provides an outstanding combination of value, quality and proven reliability for use with these types of applications and are often a direct upgrade over other canister anode offerings. Below is a comparison of MATCOR’s MMO canister anode vs. conventional high silicon cast iron anodes, in addition to a real life project example comparing the costs associated with both canister anode types.

MMP Canister Anode Unique Construction Features

Understanding the value of the MATCOR MMP™ anode product, starts with its unique construction features as follows:

HSCI vs MMO/Ti Canister Anode Type

Most canister anodes consist of either a High Silicon Cast Iron (HSCI) anode or some configuration of MMO/Ti anode installed in a large metallic “canister” that is filled with coke backfill. The canister is capped with the anode cable extending out the top of the anode cap. Once installed, the exterior metallic canister housing is part of the anode system and will consume quickly as current is discharged off the anode, through the coke backfill and then off the external metallic housing.

It is important to note that the housing is only intended to survive transportation and installation. Once installed, it is expected to be consumed, leaving behind the anode and coke backfill.

One of the most important considerations in evaluating any canister anode technology is to evaluate the anode technology that is inside the canister anode.

HSCI anode technology is an older anode technology that remains extremely popular around the world. It is popular because it is cheap and readily available from many suppliers. Because HSCI anodes are simply castings of a specific formulation of iron, they are available from a wide range of manufacturers with casting facilities spread across the globe. Any foundry can cast the basic HSCI anode. Testing for anode composition assures that the basic elements are present in the correct ratio, however, the mechanical and more importantly the electrical (anode) characteristics are dependent on a lot more than just having the correct ratio of components. Also critical are the canister anode:

  • Casting process
  • Micro-structure
  • Density and consistency of the casting
  • Presence of trace elements
  • Consistency of the grain structure
  • and more…

Unfortunately, it is very difficult to assess the quality of a particular anode casting batch without extensive long term testing. Even the most experienced and reputable cast iron anode suppliers will admit that HSCI anode quality and anode performance can vary significantly even within different casing batches from the same manufacturer.

This leaves buyers with a real challenge in confirming that the anodes they are purchasing will provide the anode life and current output that they are specifying because of the wide range of casting quality issues that can occur with HSCI anodes and the large number of casting facilities offering this type of product.

Mixed metal oxide coated titanium (MMO/Ti) anodes are also a common anode technology utilized in canister anodes – typically these anodes consist of a titanium substrate on to which a mixture of mixed metal oxides is electro-deposited on to the substrate and thermally cured. The MMO coating typically uses a base of Iridium as the primary catalyst that allows the coating to perform as an anode.

MMO Anodes Easier to Test for Quality

As with HSCI anodes, quality is an issue with MMO/Ti anodes; however, there are some key factors that lead to making MMO/TI anodes easier to QA/QC than conventional cast iron anodes.

First, there are no real mechanical concerns other than assuring that there is good adherence between the MMO coating and the underlying substrate. Because the substrate is pure titanium the mechanical properties are quite consistent (ASTM Grade 1 or Grade 2 Titanium is considered commercial pure titanium and either can be used for MMO/TI anodes). Testing for coating adhesion is a rather simple test that can be performed on a test coupon from the same process or on the anode itself.

In addition to having a very stable, homogeneous substrate, the MMO/Ti anode performance can be tested using accelerated life testing to provide an evaluation of the performance of the specific coating mixture that is applied. As with HSCI anodes, there are a large (and growing) number of suppliers of MMO/Ti anode materials; however, testing can be used to confirm the anode material quality. MATCOR MMP™anodes use MMO/Ti anode material with a proven track record. Additionally, third party inspection and testing of MATCOR’s MMO/Ti anode material is available for a nominal inspection charge.

Canister Anode Configuration

The actual anode inside the canister can have a wide range of configurations; however, the most common configuration is the tubular anode. All HSCI anodes are cast in tubular (either solid or hollow tubular) configurations and many of the MMO/Ti canister anodes also use tubular anodes.

For HSCI tubular anodes, the brittle nature of the anode must be taken into consideration when transporting, handling and installing the anode as dropping the anode canister can lead to breaking or cracking of the HSCI anode.

MATCOR’s MMP™ Anode is unique in that we utilize a solid titanium rod as our substrate. This provides several advantages over typical MMO/Ti configurations utilizing tubular anodes. The cable to anode connection is easier and more secure when connecting to a solid rod as opposed to trying to connect a cable to the inside of an anode tube. The solid titanium rod is also stronger and unlikely to break should it be bent.

Other MMO/Ti configurations can also be used inside a canister anode including MMO/Ti strips and ribbons. There is nothing inherently wrong with these configurations as long as the anode to cable connection is properly designed. Improper anode to cable connection designs can lead to premature anode failure.

Canister Anode Connection Technology

Typical anode connections used for discreet canister anodes usually consist of some version of a pressure fit mechanical connection with an epoxy sealant covering the anode to cable connection. Anode to cable connection failures have historically been a significant cause of premature anode failure. Depending on the anode type and configuration, the location of the anode connection can also have an impact on performance – especially for HSCI anodes that consume rapidly and may be subject to necking effects– with MMO/Ti anodes that are dimensionally stable (i.e. do not physically consume) this is much less of an issue.

MATCOR’s MMP™ anode utilizes a multi-step welded connection technology to assure the anode to cable connection is mechanically and electrically secure and properly sealed from the ingress of moisture that can lead to premature anode failure. The multi-step anode connection includes a mechanical crimp followed by a welding process. The mechanically secure welded connection then has a layer of non-conductive hot melt sealant followed by a heat shrink sleeve with a second sealant layer on the interior of the heat shrink. This heavily engineered connection technology has proven to be exceptionally effective with hundreds of thousands of connections in service over the past 20 years.

spiral-thin-wall-canister-anode
Typical spiral wound 0.7mm thin walled canister

Heavy Duty Canister Anode Construction

Most canister anodes are constructed using a thin walled galvanized steel spiral wound pipe material. This material is commonly used in the HVAC world as a ducting material and is readily available commercially. This material is typically 0.7mm thickness (24 gauge) with a spiral wound construction. This type of canister provides only a modest amount of mechanical strength and must be very carefully handled during transportation and installation.

matcor-mmo-canister-anode-pipe
MATCOR’s 1.85mm EMT seamless steel pipe offers 250% thicker wall

MATCOR’s MMP™ Canister anode utilizes a thicker walled EMT seamless steel pipe with a typical material thickness of 1.8 mm or 250% times the thickness of typical canister anodes. This additional wall thickness makes the MMP™ anode a much stronger product – you can drive a fork truck or backhoe over our anode and not significantly damage the canister.

Economic Considerations

The actual installed cost of the anodes is an important consideration in selecting the optimal anode solution. As noted previously, the anode system quality and design integrity should also be factored into the evaluation as these factors can serve to reduce the anode system’s life in the field.

Some factors that should be considered include:

Anode Operating Life (Amp-Years)

Every anode has an operating life. For HSCI anodes the calculation of an anode life is complicated by the inherent variability in HSCI anode casting. The nominal consumption rate of HSCI anodes is typically assumed to be between 0.5 to 1.0 lbs/amp-year (0.23 kg/amp-year to 0.45 kg/amp-year) in a coke backfill. This wide range is consistent with the variation in anode consistency and quality inherent in the anode type. The consumption rate can also vary depending on the environment and the operating current density.

Additionally, a utilization factor is typically applied to the calculations as the anode can never be fully utilized – at some point the anode consumption is such that the anode to cable connection is lost prior to fully consuming all of the anode’s mass. For stick anodes with an end connection this is typically 65% (meaning that 35% of the anode mass is unusable) while for tubular anodes with center connections this utilization factor is closer to 85%.

MMO/Ti anodes are considered dimensionally stable anodes and do not physically consume. They are instead electro-catalytic in nature – they cause a reaction to occur that generates DC current flow without actually being a reactant and thus are not consumed. The catalytic component in the MMO coating does; however, have a finite life that is relatively consistent and can be determined based on the accelerated testing performed by the manufacturer.

The challenge with MMO/Ti anodes is that the coating loading is on the order of mg/m2. With such a light coating load, it is often difficult for the anode manufacturer to control the coating loading to exactly the thickness that would be optimal. Most MMO/Ti anodes are supplied with more coating than required to assure that the coating thickness QA/QC spot checks exceed the minimum specified coating loading. MATCOR’s experience has been that the anode coatings tend to exceed that required coating loading by a significant margin assuring even longer life than the stated design life.

Anode Weight

One of the key advantages of the MATCOR MMP™ anode is the low weight over HSCI anodes for a similar current capacity. HSCI anodes consume at a relatively high rate and require significant anode mass to provide the current output and life required. Weight has two key impacts; one is economic as the lower the anode weight the cheaper it is to transport and install, and the second is a safety issue as the heavier the anode the greater the risk of injury associated with the proper transportation and handling of the anode during installation. While the transportation costs are easily quantified, the safety benefit of a much lighter anode to be installed is much more difficult to quantify but should be considered in the anode selection.

Anode Installation Replacement Cost

Another consideration that should be given is the cost of having to replace an anode installation more frequently. This metric is often not considered; however, there is a very real value to having an installation that lasts 25 years versus only 18 years and the additional incremental cost for the additional life has a real value that should be considered in the economic evaluation.

Savings from using fewer, higher output anodes

Another consideration that is often overlooked is the savings that might be achieved by using fewer anodes that are capable of higher output to reduce the overall installation costs. The incremental cost of fewer, larger anodes could result in a significant cost savings over using more anodes that are rated for lower output. When considering the use of fewer, higher output anodes the impact on system resistance could be an issue as the power supply may have to be larger and the operating power higher to overcome the additional system resistance from fewer anodes. Typically power costs are rather nominal and not a major consideration in this type of economic evaluation.

Canister Anodes System Example

Please note that this is a real project example and is intended to show the methodology used to evaluate two different options – one using HSCI anodes and the other using MMP™ canister anodes. The costs associated with this project are not suitable for other applications – each project has its own costs that must be evaluated for that specific project.

Cathodic Protection Requirements

Shallow horizontal ground bed rated for 60 Amps using multiple anodes in parallel at a depth of 12 feet and spaced 15 feet from each other. Each hole would be 8” diameter and the hole would be filled with coke around the anode including one foot below the anode and one foot above the anode. System to be suitable for 30 years anode life. Soil resistivity is assumed to be 3000 ohm-cm.

Canister Anode Options

Two anode options were considered as follows:

 HSCI Solid Stick AnodeMATCOR MMP™3605
Anode TypeBare HSCI AnodeCanister MMO/Ti rod
Anode Dimensions3" x 60"3" x 60"
Anode Weight, ea110 lbs44 lbs
Anode Life, ea95.3 amp-years*125 amp-years
Anode Cost$325$210
Freight Cost/Anode$22$9
* Based on 0.75 lbs/amp year consumption rate and 65% utilization factor for solid stick anode

Additional Costs

  • Installation cost to drill each hole, install anode and make header cable connection estimated at $700 USD/hole
  • 180 lbs of coke backfill per hole, including freight, estimated at $135/hole
  • Cable costs for header cable, estimated at $1 per foot
  • Cable to anode splice kit estimated at $35 per connection

Calculations

Minimum number of anodes required to meet 30 year life operating at 60 amps:

Roundup {(60 amps x 30 years) / Anode life} = minimum # of anodes

  • HSCI Stick Anode – 19 anodes resulting in 30.19 years design life
  • MATCOR MMP™ – 15 anodes resulting in 31.25 years design life

Anode System Resistance

Based on Dwight’s equation using an 8” diameter hole and 7 ft coke column in 3000 ohm-cm soil the resistance of a single anode (Ra) is 7.68 ohms. The resistance for multiple anodes in parallel is Ra/Number of parallel anodes

  • 19 HSCI anodes – anode bed resistance is 0.40 ohms
  • 15 MMP™3605 anodes – anode bed resistance is 0.51 ohms

Installed Cost

Based on the cost assumptions the total installed costs are:

  • HSCI 19 anode system:    $23,408.00
  • MATCOR MMP™ 3605:    $16,560.00

Contact MATCOR about your canister anode cathodic protection requirements or learn more about our MMP Anode (MMO) canister anodes.

External Tank Bottom Cathodic Protection

External corrosion of above ground storage tank (AST) bottoms is a significant problem for tank owners. Corrosion professionals tasked with protecting these structures should consider multiple factors. One thing is clear: proper installation of an impressed current tank bottom cathodic protection system plays an important role in reducing corrosion and extending the service life of the tank bottom.

Concentric ring anode configuration ideal for tank bottom cathodic protection

Tank Bottom Cathodic Protection Article from NACE Materials Performance

Learn more about this newer method of AST cathodic protection and its benefits over the more traditional grid system.

For additional information about tank bottom cathodic protection, please read our article in the special supplement “Corrosion Control for Aboveground and Belowground Storage Tanks” in the May issue of NACE International’s Materials Performance.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Contact MATCOR about your AST cathodic protection requirements or learn more about our Tank Ring Anode™ System.


Learn more about Tank Cathodic Protection


Cathodic Protection for Missile Defense Shield in Romania

As you watch the evening news or pick up your daily paper you will very likely read about the new Missile Defense Shield in Romania that came on line this week. The Russian response has been loud and indignant. This story will be all over the evening news, cable channels and newspapers.

But did you know that the Deveselu facility in Romania has a MATCOR Cathodic Protection system protecting the buried piping and process tanks? MATCOR VP of engineering Glenn Shreffler made three trips to the site during its construction. So when you watch the evening news and they discuss the “controversial” missile defense base in Romania, we are proud that MATCOR anode systems are hard at work protecting the assets that protect our NATO allies.

Contact MATCOR about your tank and piping cathodic corrosion prevention requirements or learn more about our wide range of cathodic protection products.

MMO Anode Technology: The latest in Cathodic Protection

MMO anode technology has taken over the cathodic protection industry and MATCOR has been on the forefront for the last 20 years. Ted Huck, our VP of International Sales was interviewed at the recent NACE Corrosion Conference. In this video he discusses MMO anode technology for cathodic protection systems and the importance of reliable anode to cable connections.

MMO Anode Technology

MMO anodes, or mixed metal oxide anodes are the latest technology in the corrosion industry. Mixed metal oxide anodes are lightweight and durable with a very low consumption rate. 

MMO anodes are a mix of metal oxide electrocatalysts. In the presence of a DC voltage source they cause an electrical reaction that generates cathodic protection current. Unlike conventional impressed current anodes that physically consume as part of the cathodic protection reaction (at rates measured in kg/amp-year), MMO anodes are dimensionally stable and do not consume. Instead, they have a long and predictable catalytic life. MMO anodes consist of a thin coating of the MMO catalyst over an inert lightweight titanium substrate and are available in a wide range of shapes and configurations.

Why Cathodic Protection Systems Fail

Waterproof Anode to Cable Connection to protects MMO anode cathodic protection systems
Kynex® Patented, Waterproof Anode to Cable Connection

The most critical component to any cathodic protection anode system is the connection of the anode to the cable that runs back to the power supply. Because the cable is part of the anode system, if it has any nicks or defects or is not water tight, that cable can become part of the anode and will very quickly consume. When that happens, the anode fails. So, with cathodic protection systems it is imperative to have the highest quality connections.

Typically, when a cathodic protection anode system fails, it is not the anode that fails, it is the anode connection that fails. MATCOR has developed a proprietary technology for connecting wire anodes to cable, called Kynex®. Wire anodes are the heart of a lot of our products and this proprietary anode technology is a huge leap forward in the reliability of these connections.

Cost-effective, Reliable Cathodic Protection Solutions

At the end of the day, for our clients, it’s all about delivering value. It’s providing a cost effective solution that’s going to serve them for a very long time. As a designer and manufacturer of cathodic protection anode systems, we are able to specifically address client needs with customized corrosion prevention solutions that provide:

  • Long life
  • Great economic value
  • Superior reliability

MATCOR Products and Services

MATCOR is one of the world’s leading cathodic protection companies. We design, manufacture, install and service cathodic protection systems for clients worldwide. MATCOR provides services to the pipeline, midstream and oil & gas industries, protecting assets such as pipelines, storage tanks, and compressor stations. We also do a lot of work in the power industries, petrochemical, and chemical industries. Anywhere where you have buried steel structures, we are there to stop corrosion.
We encourage you to contact MATCOR through our website where our corrosion specialists and engineers can provide a solution tailored to your needs.

Not Just a Walk Along the ROW: Close Interval Potential Surveys

Close Interval Potential Surveys (CIPS) or close interval surveys (CIS) for those in the United States, are an invaluable assessment tool used to maintain pipeline integrity. Close Interval Surveys are frequently mandated by pipeline regulatory authorities.

Keys to a Successful CIPS Survey

  • Selecting a qualified survey crew
  • Advanced planning
  • Selecting the appropriate CIPS Type
  • Accurate CIPS Data Collection
  • Expert Data Analysis and Reporting

Close Interval Surveys (CIS, CIPS)Learn more about the keys to a successful CIPS survey and other considerations in our recent article appearing in World Pipelines, “Not Just a Walk Along the ROW” by Ted Huck.

READ THE ARTICLE

Are you ready for spring close interval surveys?

MATCOR is here to help. Our experienced and NACE-trained crews are ready to perform close interval surveys to keep your pipeline cathodic protection systems in compliance and operating effectively.

  • Excellent safety record
  • Accurate, reliable data collection
  • Daily field progress reports
  • Extensive engineering and IT support

Contact MATCOR about your CIPS requirements or learn more about our close interval survey capabilities

 

Corrosion Industry Leaders MATCOR and CP Masters Join Forces

Chalfont, PA (Aug 31, 2015) – MATCOR, Inc., the trusted full-service provider of proprietary cathodic protection products, systems, and corrosion engineering solutions recently announced that the company has joined forces with CP Masters, Inc. The combined company will be known as MATCOR.

MATCOR_logoCP Masters brings 30 years of cathodic protection technical and system installation expertise to the MATCOR team. In addition to industry-qualified and experienced people, the company maintains one of the industry’s largest fleets of construction equipment.

This move enables MATCOR to execute cathodic protection and AC mitigation projects directly and efficiently. Additional benefits to customers include:

  • Improved cost-effectiveness
  • Consistent, high quality construction and installation services
  • Access to expert, conveniently located survey teams
  • Turnkey cathodic protection and AC mitigation solutions

“CP Masters and MATCOR have over 70 years of combined name recognition in the industry—with CP Masters known for superior construction and installation services, and MATCOR known for engineering expertise and proprietary products,” said Kevin Pitts, President of MATCOR, Inc. “Now as one company, we are able to offer customers a powerful combination of the best people, services and products in the corrosion industry.”

ABOUT MATCOR

3 Pipe Cathodic Protection Methods for New Plant Construction

Cathodic Protection for Underground Piping Overview

Pipe Cathodic Protection | Cathodic Protection for Underground Piping | Steel Pipe Corrosion Protection Methods
Steel Pipe Corrosion Protection Methods: Deep Anode, Shallow/Distributed Anode Bed and Linear AnodeCathodic Protection

This article reviews 3 steel pipe corrosion protection methods utilizing cathodic protection.

Cathodic protection, when applied properly, is an effective means to prevent corrosion of underground plant piping. For many underground applications, such as pipelines, cathodic protection system design is relatively straightforward. Plant and facility environments, however, are not simple applications. Plants have congested underground piping systems in a tightly spaced footprint. The presence of copper grounding systems, foundations with reinforcing steel embedded in concrete, conduit, utility piping and structural pilings (either bare or concrete with reinforcing steel) can greatly complicate the task of designing a pipe cathodic protection system.

For simple plant facilities, it is possible to isolate the piping and utilize a conventional galvanic corrosion prevention system. This works only if the plant piping is electrically isolated from other underground structures for the life of the facility. For most plant and facility applications, it is not practical to isolate the piping from the grounding system for the life of the facility. In these cases an impressed current anode system is the only alternative.

3 Methods of Cathodic Protection for Underground Piping and Structures

There are three basic approaches to cathodically protect underground piping and structures using impressed current anodes.

  1. Deep Anode

    One method is the deep anode in which high current capacity anodes are installed from the structure in a deep hole drilled vertically 150+ feet deep. This is analogous to lighting a football field with floodlights.

  2. Shallow Anode or Distributed Anode Bed

    Another method is to use a shallow ground bed anode design where many smaller capacity ground bed anodes are spaced near the intended structures – analogous to street lamps lighting a street.

  3. Linear Anode

    The third method is to place a linear anode parallel to and in close proximity to the piping to be protected discharging current continuously along its length – similar to fiber optic lighting.

This technical bulletin details the advantages of using the linear anode approach for new plant construction projects to protect buried piping in a congested environment. This approach provides the most effective solution both technically and commercially.

Pipe Cathodic Protection Design Issues for Plants & Facilities

Electrical Isolation in a Congested Plant Environment

Electrical isolation is a major concern when designing a CP system for any plant or facility application. Isolating a single cross country pipeline segment from point A to point B is achieved rather simply through the use of electrical isolation flanges/isolation joints that the pipeline operator maintains and tests regularly. The realities of power plant piping networks, on the other hand, significantly complicate electrical isolation. By code, everything above grade in a plant must be grounded, yet it is common to see pipe cathodic protection systems designed based on isolation of the buried piping. Even if electrical isolation is achieved during the plant construction, maintaining electrical isolation over the life of the facility may not be realistic. Given the speed and complexity with which new plants are erected, achieving electrical isolation during construction is no simple task. Once installed, electrical isolation flange kits require regular monitoring and periodic replacement that often does not occur. Piping modifications and other plant maintenance activities can also result in an inadvertent loss of electrical isolation. Cathodic protection for underground piping that relies on electrical isolation should be avoided for plant applications.

Current Distribution – a Critical Issue in Pipe Cathodic Protection Design

Another critical issue that must be properly considered during the design of a CP system for plant applications is the highly congested underground environment and the challenges of achieving thorough current distribution. Buried piping is often located in congested underground areas in close proximity to grounding systems, foundations with reinforcing steel, pilings systems, metallic duct banks and other structures that can shield current from the piping systems that are the intended target of plant cathodic protection systems. It is virtually impossible to assess where current will go in a plant environment – the more remote the anode source, the more difficult it is to assure appropriate current distribution.

Stray Current

When discussing current distribution, it is also important to discuss the potential for stray current. For grounded systems, current that is picked up by other buried metallic structures is merely current that is wasted and not available to protect the intended buried piping structures. For isolated metallic structures, such as foreign pipelines, ductile iron piping systems, and nearby facilities or structures, stray current may be a significant concern. Stray current problems occur when current is picked up on an isolated structure and later discharges off that structure and back to a grounded structure. At the location where stray currents discharge, rapid corrosion may be inadvertently induced on the isolated structure.

The Case for Linear Anode Cathodic Protection System Design

The linear anode solution consists of long runs of linear anode installed parallel and in very close proximity to the piping being protected. The current output is kept very low and is generally consistent across the entire system. A linear anode is in effect a distributed system with an infinite number of anodes spaced continually. This system provides the best technical cathodic protection solution and minimizes the current output required as follows:

  • Does not require electrical isolation.
    Because the linear anode is closely located next to the piping being protected, electrical isolation is not a significant concern. The anode is “closely coupled” to the piping and operates with a very low anode gradient that minimizes any losses to nearby structures including grounding.
  • Assures good current distribution as the anode runs parallel to the piping being protected.
    The linear anode cathodic protection system design eliminates any requirement for supplemental anodes to address areas where remote anodes may be shielded after the CP system is commissioned. Wherever the piping goes, the linear anode follows in the same trench. This also makes it very easy to adapt the design during piping revisions that may change the piping system routing as the plant construction proceeds.
  • Eliminates risks of stray current.
    Close proximity to the piping being protected significantly limits current losses to other structures and virtually eliminates shielding and stray current concerns. This also significantly reduces the total current requirements for the system, reducing the rectifier requirements.
  • Access issues – the linear anode is installed in very close proximity to the piping that is to be protected.
    This minimizes the risk of third party damage and reduces trenching required for buried cable. If installed in conjunction with the piping, the anode can be placed in the same trench as the piping affording the anode protection by the piping itself from external damage. This is a very cost effective cathodic protection installation when installed concurrently with the piping.
  • Ease of installation – when installed alongside the piping as the piping is being installed, the installation is simply a matter of laying the anode cable in the trench.

Our experts are happy to answer your questions about cathodic protection for underground piping.

Contact a Corrosion Expert

MATCOR Profiled in India Corrosion Publication

MATCOR Profile in Coatings and Anti-Corrosion Engineering Review, Apr/May 2015 issueThank you to Abraham Mathai at Coatings and Anti Corrosion Engineering Review for the profile about MATCOR and our 40th anniversary in the April/May 2015 issue!

MATCOR was founded in 1975 by William R. Schutt when he set out to develop a high quality, reliable source for cathodic protection products and equipment. The company designed and provided the first commercial cathodic protection system for reinforced concrete bridge decks that same year. The company has grown to offer a broad portfolio of proprietary cathodic protection and AC mitigation products, in addition to complete corrosion engineering services.

In March of 2015, MATCOR was acquired by Brand Energy & Infrastructure Services (Brand). Brand also owns CP Masters, Inc., a leader in the design and construction of cathodic protection and corrosion control prevention in the North American energy markets.

READ THE COMPLETE PROFILE

Video Demonstrates Cathodic Protection System Installation

Iron Gopher® Impressed Current Linear Anode System designed for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) is installed beneath an above ground storage tank (AST)

Chalfont, PA  – MATCOR, Inc. the trusted full-service provider of proprietary cathodic protection products, systems, and corrosion engineering solutions recently released a video showing the installation of the company’s Iron Gopher impressed current linear anode system at the site of an above ground storage tank in Texas.

Trenching to install cathodic protection systems may not be feasible for applications such as cross country pipelines, congested industrial environments and under above ground storage tanks. For these horizontal directional drilling applications, a linear anode with superior mechanical strength is required. The Iron Gopher with Kynex® technology is the only impressed current linear anode designed specifically for cathodic protection in horizontal directional drilling applications.

“As another example, Colonial Pipeline installed several thousand feet of our Iron Gopher® linear anode at an HDD project in NE Georgia,” said Ted Huck, VP of Sales for MATCOR. “With its unique design and greatly increased strength, Iron Gopher is superior to anything seen in the market for cathodic protection in HDD applications.”

Learn about MATCOR’s complete cathodic protection installation services.

About MATCOR

Linear Anode Cathodic Protection Presentation at NACE UAE

MATCOR to Present on Impressed Current Linear Anode Cathodic Protection at NACE UAE Corrosion Conference in Abu Dhabi

Chalfont, PA (April 27, 2015) – MATCOR, Inc. the trusted full-service provider of proprietary cathodic protection products, systems, and corrShailesh Javia, MATCOR, Inc. to present on linear anode cathodic protection at NACE UAE.osion engineering solutions will present a paper exploring the use of flexible impressed current linear anodes to minimize current densities for a wide range of cathodic protection applications at the annual NACE UAE Corrosion Conference held at the St. Regis in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates May 12-14, 2015.

Flexible Impressed Current Linear Anode Cathodic Protection
Shailesh Javia, MATCOR
Wednesday, May 13, 2015, 3:35-4:00 p.m. in Al Mudhaif 1

The presentation explores flexible impressed current linear anode cathodic protection that extends the benefits of linear anodes for various CP applications. To minimize current distribution challenges, the linear anodes are designed utilizing multiple internal connections, which provides redundancy and protection against uneven anode consumption, minimizes current densities and allows placement in close proximity to the structure. The linear anode is simple to install, requiring only a small trench, and is ideal for congested areas and tight spaces. See below for the complete abstract.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Shailesh Javia serves as International Director for MATCOR and has over 22 years experience focused on corrosion engineering and cathodic protection. His diverse knowledge and experience includes designing cathodic protection systems, managing turnkey CP projects and conducting commissioning surveys for cross country and city gas pipelines, tanks and vessels, tank bottoms, and industrial facilities including fertilizer, petrochemical and power plants, and refineries. Mr. Javia is a certified NACE Cathodic Protection Technologist, has successfully completed the NACE Direct Assessment Course and has presented several papers at NACE and ASME conferences.

ABSTRACT: Applications of Impressed Current Linear Anodes in Cathodic Protection

Flexible impressed current linear anodes can extend the benefits
 of linear anodes to a wide range 
of cathodic protection applications. Tight spaces, high traffic areas, poorly coated pipelines, new construction tank bottom, tank bottom retrofits, reinforcing steel-in-concrete, sheet pile walls or inside large diameter pipes – are all good examples of linear anode cathodic protection applications.

Linear anodes handle current distribution challenges by minimizing current densities, in addition to placement in close proximity to the structure being protected from corrosion. Innovative design utilizing 
multiple internal connections provides redundancy, protects against uneven
 anode consumption and minimizes
 voltage drop.

Linear anodes can simply 
be laid alongside a new pipeline; cable
 plowed next to an existing pipeline, or 
installed utilizing horizontal directional 
drilling (HDD) under an existing
 structure. Linear anodes require only a small trench for installation, ideal for congested areas and minimizing landowner “right of way” issues.

ABOUT MATCOR

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